Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition

The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition offers four major concentrations that lead to the Bachelor of Science degree in either Kinesiology or Nutrition.

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology

  • Exercise Science and Health Promotion
  • Movement Science

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition

  • Coordinated Program
  • Nutrition Science

BS in Kinesiology

The undergraduate program in kinesiology offers a common core in the foundations of kinesiology (human structure, function, and movement) and two major concentrations: 1) Exercise Science and Health Promotion and 2) Movement Science.

The Exercise Science and Health Promotion concentration prepares students for careers in fitness, health care, sport, workplace, and public health settings. Students develop the skills to design, deliver, and evaluate service programs for individuals, groups, and populations. Movement Science emphasizes basic science learning through a series of rigorous courses combined with the application of scientific principles. The program offers ideal preparation for graduate study or professional training in the life/health sciences.

Kinesiology courses are taught by nationally and globally recognized leaders in their areas of teaching, research, and service who emphasize translating science into practice through hands-on learning, independent study, and internship experiences.  Graduates of both concentrations move on to graduate or professional training and careers in areas such as medicine, health promotion, worksite wellness, research, occupational therapy, physical therapy, dentistry, pharmacy, personal training, health-related businesses, and other health-related opportunities.

Transfer Admission Requirements

Students seeking admission to the department as a transfer student must have earned a minimum of 36 semester hours (54 quarter hours) or more at another college or university and must meet the entrance requirements that are specified for transfer students. The minimum transfer grade point average for admission is 2.50/4.00. No more than 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of credit may be accepted as transfer work from a two-year college. Complete transcripts from all postsecondary institutions must be submitted in order to be considered for admission. See the Office of Admission Transfer Guide for more information about transfer admission requirements.

BS in Nutrition

The Coordinated Program in Nutrition is an Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) accredited coordinated program. It combines the ACEND required didactic course work with the required supervised practice hours that prepare graduates to sit for the Registration Examination for Dietitians.

The Nutrition Science program, an accredited Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD), provides students with the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) required didactic course work. Upon completion of the Nutrition Science Program, students are eligible to apply for an accredited dietetic internship at another institution. After successfully completing a dietetic internship, students are eligible to sit for the Registration Examination for Dietitians. This program is also intended for students who do not wish to become registered dietitians, but instead plan to pursue advanced degrees in nutritional sciences, public health, allied health, or a professional degree in medicine.

Coordinated Program Concentration

Currently granted accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000
Chicago, IL 60606-6995
Phone: (312) 899-0040, ext. 5400
http://www.eatright.org

The Coordinated Program requires students to complete six semesters of full-time study, which includes didactic classroom work in conjunction with over 1,200 hours of supervised practice experiences provided at a variety of locations throughout the Chicagoland area.

The Coordinated Program prepares graduates for entry-level positions as dietitians in a variety of employment settings, such as healthcare institutions, government organizations, business, industry, and community health agencies. With experience or advanced education, career opportunities can be found in research, education, or private practice. The employment outlook for dietitians is projected to grow in the twenty-first century.

Dietitians provide nutritional care to people in health and disease throughout the life cycle in accordance with their nutritional requirements and food habits. Dietitians’ activities include the provision of direct inpatient and outpatient services as well as community program planning and evaluation, clinical protocol development, food service management, and research. Therefore, a dietitian must be knowledgeable in the biological and physical sciences, psychology, sociology, education, and management and must have expertise in food habits, food composition, food service, science of food and nutrition, energy and nutrient needs, program development and evaluation, and research methods. Dietitians counsel clients, as well as work with other members of the healthcare team in providing nutritional care in the clinical setting, and work with consumers in wellness programs and community agencies. Management of personnel, budgets, food operations, and consumer-oriented services in the food or healthcare industry are other areas for dietitians.

Nutrition Science Concentration

The Nutrition Science concentration prepares students for a future career as a registered dietitian, as well as for graduate study in nutrition, medicine, public health, other allied health fields, and dentistry. It is currently granted initial accreditation by The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD).

Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000
Chicago, IL 60606-6995
phone: (312) 899-0040, ext. 5400
http://www.eatright.org

The research and teaching is focused on the sciences of nutrition, physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology and the application of knowledge in these disciplines to the maintenance of health and well-being of humans throughout their lives. The curriculum offers a wide range of courses on the nutritional, epidemiological, and behavioral aspects of human diseases, a broad perspective on human biology (including cultural factors), and a strong clinical orientation. Students who intend to become dietitians may choose to apply for an accredited dietetic internship outside of UIC to be completed post-graduation.

Transfer Admission Requirements

Students seeking admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition programs must meet these minimum requirements:

  • Sixty semester or 90 quarter hours of acceptable academic credit
  • Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50/4.00 (However, currently the average GPA of students accepted into the Coordinated Program is 3.60/4.00, while the average GPA of students accepted into the Nutrition Science program is 3.40/4.00.)
  • Successful completion of the required prerequisite courses

The applicant’s personal characteristics, motivation, academic background, and work experiences are factors evaluated in selecting candidates for admission into the Coordinated Program through recommendations as well as written and face-to-face interviews.

See the Office of Admission Transfer Guide for more information about transfer admission requirements.

Distinction

Departmental Distinction will be awarded to a student graduating with a BS in Kinesiology or a BS in Nutrition if the student meets the following criteria:

  • Distinction: 3.75 to 3.89 UIC GPA
  • High Distinction: 3.90 or above UIC GPA

Undergraduate Experiential Learning

Undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to participate in Experiential Learning.  A guided research project, independent study, undergraduate teaching experience, or an internship, can be one of the most valuable experiences of a college education. The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition offers the following opportunities:

Independent Study

KN 396 is designed to be a flexible course allowing juniors and seniors to gain experience in Kinesiology-related research. Taken for 1–3 hours, KN 396 requires close interaction with one or more faculty members over the course of one semester.

Internship Opportunity

Students with Junior or Senior standing who have an interest in expanding their classroom learning experience into a professional career environment are encouraged to apply for the Internship Program (KN 393). Over the course of the semester, each student is required to obtain a minimum of 300 hours of hands-on learning at their designated internship site, earning 6 credit hours for the semester. A wide variety of internship opportunities within and outside of the Chicagoland area are available, and are designed to meet the specific career interests of each student. Students should inquire about the internship application process one to two semesters prior to the term during which they would like to intern.

Senior Research Seminar and Project

The Senior Research Seminar and Project is offered as a capstone experience to students in both concentrations who have achieved a grade point average of 3.25/4.00 by their senior year of study. Eligible students complete the two-semester sequence by taking KN 398 and KN 399. Typically, the first semester is devoted to developing and proposing a topic and obtaining any necessary approvals for the study (e.g., Institutional Review Board). The second semester consists of implementing, writing, and presenting the research project. Students earn six semester hours of graduation credit. In addition to the grade point average requirement, all Senior Research Seminars and Projects require a faculty mentor.

Summer Research Scholarship

Promising students of sophomore standing or above who have demonstrated an interest in the research of Kinesiology faculty may apply to receive a Summer Research Scholarship. Recipients of the award will work closely with a principal investigator and graduate students in a Kinesiology laboratory on a project designed by the student and faculty member. Depending on the length and nature of the research experience, the scholarship may include a stipend, tuition waiver, graduation credit, or some combination of the three. If the student and faculty member desire the work accomplished during this experience may be later developed into the student’s Senior Research Seminar and Project.

Study Abroad

The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition offers the opportunities to study abroad. These programs do not interrupt enrollment residence and with department and college approval, students may apply credit earned in the program toward the degree. More detailed information on these programs is available from the individual department. Extensive study abroad opportunities are offered by the UIC Study Abroad Office. For more information, please visit the Study Abroad website studyabroad.uic.edu.

Undergraduate Teaching Assistant

Each semester, undergraduate students have the opportunity to apply to be an undergraduate teaching assistant (UTA) for a selection of applied laboratory courses in Kinesiology. This is an excellent opportunity to enhance instructional skills and knowledge in areas where students have performed well.  UTAs serve as true assistants to the faculty member leading the course and their peers. If selected to be a UTA, the student will obtain credit for participating and register for KN 493.

Professional Certifications

Courses in the Exercise Science and Health Promotion concentration have been developed to assist students in becoming certified as health and fitness professionals by organizations such as the American College of Sports Medicine, National Strength and Conditioning Association, National Academy of Sports Medicine, and the American Council on Exercise. For information on certification, please see each organization’s website.

Human Nutrition Courses

HN 110. Foods. 3 hours.

The principles of food components, component interactions, food selection, preparation and service. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

HN 190. Introduction to Dietetics. 1 hour.

Overview of the dietetics profession: career options, professional development (dietetics portfolio), code of ethics, standards of practice, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics position papers, the legislative process, and professional resources. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above.

HN 196. Nutrition. 3 hours.

Provides a foundation in the basic principles of human nutrition in maintaining and promoting health through good dietary choices.

HN 200. Nutritional Assessment. 3 hours.

Introduction to the dietetic profession including the nutritional care process. Emphasis on developing basic skills in medical terminology, nutritional assessment, interviewing, counseling and recording. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 196 and HN 307 and admission to the undergraduate program in human nutrition, or consent of the instructor.

HN 202. Culture and Food. 2 hours.

Provides a perspective on factors that affect the development of food habits, similarities and differences across cultures, and how the use of foods provides a window to multiculturalism. Course Information: Previously listed as HN 302. World Cultures course.

HN 203. Culture and Food Lab. 2 hours.

Practical application of accurately preparing, presenting, and modifying cultural specific foods. Course Information: Field trip required at a nominal fee. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor. Corequisites: Requires concurrent registration in HN 202.

HN 296. Nutrition and Physical Activity. 3 hours.

Integrates the fundamental principles of nutrition and physical activity to provide students with knowledge of proper nutrition for improving health, fitness and performance. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 196 or consent of the instructor.

HN 300. Science of Foods. 3 hours.

Scientific aspects of food and its preparation with emphasis on clinical applications. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 110 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

HN 306. Nutrition Education. 4 hours.

Study of theoretical and applied strategies for intructional planning and assessment that are applied to both group and individual nutrition education. Course Information: Credit is not given for HN 306 if the student has credit in HN 201 or HN 305. Prerequisite(s): HN 200; or consent of the instructor.

HN 307. Human Nutrition and Metabolism. 3 hours.

Human nutrient requirements and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, minerals and non-nutritive substances found in foods. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 196 and one semester of college level general chemistry; or consent of the instructor.

HN 308. Nutrition Science I. 3 hours.

Metabolism, dietary regulation and requirements for energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates, including issues of under/over nutrition and regulation of food intake. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 196 and credit or concurrent registration in BCHE 307 and credit or concurrent registration in KN 251.

HN 309. Nutrition Science II. 3 hours.

Continuation of HN 308. Metabolism, dietary regulation and requirements for micronutrients such as vitamins and minerals, including issues of under/over nutrition and regulation of food intake. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 308.

HN 311. Nutrition During the Life Cycle. 3 hours.

Principles of nutrition through the life cycle, including weight management. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 307; or HN 308 and HN 309.

HN 313. Introduction to Community Nutrition. 3 hours.

Assessment, planning and evaluation of community nutrition programs using a systems approach. Course Information: Previously listed as HN 413.

HN 318. Genetic, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Chronic Diseases. 3 hours.

Addresses the most important mechanisms of pathogenesis, with an emphasis on chronic conditions. The role of inflammation and of genetic variability in modulating disease susceptibility will be addressed in detail. Course Information: Grade of C or better in HN 307 or Grade of C or better in HN 308 Credit or concurrent registration in KN 252; and junior standing or above; and approval of the department.

HN 320. Clinical Nutrition I. 4 hours.

Principles of nutrition, biochemistry, physiology, and pathology related to the management of starvation, obesity and gastrointestinal diseases, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 308 and BCHE 307 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

HN 330. Quantity Food Production. 3 hours.

Lecture/discussion on kitchen layout and design, menu planning, food procurement, storage, production and service. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 202; or consent of the instructor.

HN 332. Food Service Management. 2 hours.

Application of management principles to food service system functions. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 330.

HN 355. Supervised Practice I. 1-4 hours.

A supervised practicum in a professional setting to prepare for entry-level dietetics practice. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in HN 320 and senior standing; and approval of the department.

HN 366. Genetics, Nutrition and Health. 2 hours.

A presentation of the basic approaches to molecular and genetic analyses with an emphasis on their relevency to issues of human nutrition and health. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): BIOS 100; and CHEM 101 or CHEM 112; and junior standing or above; or approval of the department.

HN 396. Independent Undergraduate Study in Human Nutrition. 1-4 hours.

Study in selected areas of human nutrition carried out under the direction of a faculty member. Exact nature of the project is determined by the selected area of interest. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

HN 405. Food as Medicine: Cooking for Healing and Wellness. 1 hour.

A new disease state or medical diet will be covered each week and students will learn how to plan menus and prepare foods that are appropriate for each diet. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 110.

HN 407. Writing Process in Nutrition. 2 hours.

Approaches writing as an instrument of thought and a tool of persuasion. Students will learn to effectively communicate nutrition information through writing. Course Information: May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 160 and ENGL 161; and junior standing or above; and approval of the department. Recommended Background: HN 196 and HN 110.

HN 420. Clinical Nutrition II. 2 hours.

Principles of nutrition, biochemistry, physiology, pathology, education, and psychology related to management of selected diseases (renal disease, AIDS and cancer, and pediatrics). Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 320; or consent of the instructor.

HN 422. Clinical Nutrition III. 2 hours.

Principles of nutrition, biochemistry, physiology, and pathology related to the management of critically ill patients. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 309 and HN 420; or consent of the instructor.

HN 440. The Research Process. 3 hours.

Covers methods for reading and critiquing current scientific literature, overview of study designs used to address different types of research questions, basic overview of study design, data analysis and interpretation of results. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 320.

HN 455. Supervised Practice II. 1-11 hours.

An advanced supervised practicum in a professional setting to prepare for entry-level dietetics practice. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 15 hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in HN 420 and senior standing or above; and approval of the department.

HN 480. Field Study. 2 hours.

Provides practical experience to develop/strengthen the student's knowledge and skills in an area of nutrition practice. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 410; or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Clinical Practice and one Conference.

Kinesiology Courses

KN 100. Kinesiology and Nutrition: First-year Seminar. 2 hours.

Core course emphasizing the tools necessary for academic success in the transition from High School or a Community College to the University level. Careers, professional organizations, resources and issues that impact the field are also presented. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.

KN 101. Practicum in Kinesiology. 2-4 hours.

This course will provide students with the opportunity to visit multiple job sites related to their career objectives and interests. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours. Field work required. Students must provide their own transportation to and from practicum sites. Prerequisite(s): KN 100 or consent of the instructor.

KN 130. Stress Management. 3 hours.

Introduction to stress and its effects on health, with experiential application of coping strategies and relaxation techniques. Addresses conventional and innovative approaches, with a special emphasis on the role of exercise.

KN 136. Techniques and Principles of Resistance Training. 2 hours.

Teaches students how to identify, describe, execute, and progress common resistance training exercises for upper extremity, lower extremity, and trunk. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory.

KN 137. Personal Fitness. 1 hour.

Evaluation of each student's level of fitness, followed by participation in a group exercise program. Variable training modes. Discussion on fitness-related topics.

KN 152. Introduction to Exercise Science and Health. 3 hours.

Provides students with the fundamental knowledge of the structure and function of the human body, particularly as it relates to the interaction between physical activity and health and disease. Course Information: Recommended background: High school chemistry, biology and/or physiology. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion. Natural World - With Lab course.

KN 194. Special Topics in Kinesiology. 1-3 hours.

Participation and study in selected activities in Kinesiology. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

KN 200. Statistical Methods. 3 hours.

An introduction to statistics and the scientific method, including the application of selected statistical treatments to gain minimal competence to review and interpret results from published research. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): MATH 121. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion.

KN 240. Instructional Techniques in Fitness. 3 hours.

Development of instructional techniques for a variety of activities related to health promotion. Course includes planning and teaching techniques for developing programs in fitness using a variety of exercise modalities. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 243 and 251; or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

KN 243. Basic Fitness Assessment. 3 hours.

This introductory-level course addresses screening and assesses fitness components necessary to assess posture, body composition, strength, flexibility and cardio-respiratory endurance. Course Information: Extensive use of instrumentation. Prerequisite(s): KN 136. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture-Discussion.

KN 251. Human Physiological Anatomy I. 5 hours.

The structure and function of mammalian cells and tissues and human skeletal, muscular and nervous systems are discussed. Integrating the functions of the various systems is emphasized. Course Information: 5 hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 100 or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture, and one Discussion, and one Laboratory.

KN 252. Human Physiological Anatomy II. 5 hours.

The structure and function of the human endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, sensory, and reproductive systems are discussed. Integrating the functions of the various systems is emphasized. Course Information: 5 hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): KN 251 or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture, and one Discussion, and one Laboratory.

KN 253. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 hours.

The structure and function of mammalian cells and tissues and human skeletal, muscular and nervous systems are discussed. Integrating the functions of the various systems is emphasized. Course Information: Credit is not given for KN 253 if the student has credit for KN 251. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 100 or consent of the instructor.

KN 254. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 hours.

The structure and function of the human endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, sensory, and reproductive systems. Emphasis on integrating the functions of the various systems. Course Information: Credit is not given for KN 254 if the student has credit for KN 252. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): KN 253; or KN 251.

KN 255. Anatomy Laboratory I. 1 hour.

The first of a series of two courses covering the anatomy of the human body. The musculoskeletal system, the spinal cord, and the peripheral nervous system are covered. Course Information: Credit is not given for KN 255 if the student has credit for KN 251. Prerequisite(s): KN 253; or consent of the instructor.

KN 256. Anatomy Laboratory II. 1 hour.

This course is the second of a series of 2 courses covering the anatomy of the human body. The brain, special senses, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems are covered. Course Information: No credit given if the student has credit in KN 252. Prerequisite(s): KN 254; or consent of the instructor.

KN 261. Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy. 3 hours.

Designed to provide a foundational knowledge base regarding the structure of the human musculoskeletal system as it relates to movement and function. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 251.

KN 262. Training Methods for Core Stability. 3 hours.

Students learn methods to assess and program core stability for a variety of populations in the contexts of posture, endurance, strength and flexibility. Extensive use of Pilates equipment and small apparatus. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor. Recommended background: KN 261. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory.

KN 294. Special Topics in Kinesiology. 1-3 hours.

Selected topics in Kinesiology. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

KN 300. Research Methods and Inquiry in Kinesiology. 3 hours.

Introduces undergraduate students to inquiry processes and research methods applied in the field of Kinesiology. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 200 or PSCH 242; and junior standing or above; or consent of the instructor.

KN 330. Women's Health-Related Fitness. 3 hours.

The integration of social and physiological sciences to explore the relationship between women's health status and physical activity/exercise participation. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 352 and junior standing or above; or consent of the instructor.

KN 331. Sport and Exercise Injury Management. 3 hours.

Fundamental management of exercise and sport related injuries and conditions. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 252 and KN 261; and junior standing or above. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture-Discussion.

KN 335. Exercise Psychology. 3 hours.

Presents the psychological basis for exercise motivation, behavior and outcomes. Focus on application of theoretical models of exercise adherence and psychological strategies to improve participation in regular exercise. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100.

KN 337. Psychology of Injury and Recovery. 3 hours.

Introduces the psychological, social, and emotional experiences associated with the acquisition and experience of physical injuries. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100.

KN 339. Evaluating Exercise and Worksite Health Promotion. 3 hours.

Explains the theories, methods, and practices of evaluating worksite health promotion programs. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 200 and KN 345. Recommended background: KN 335 and KN 301 and KN 302.

KN 340. Aquatic Fitness Leadership. 2 hours.

Methods and techniques of water-based activities for healthy or special needs populations in the water. Students will work with equipment used in the water to enhance fitness levels: cardiovascular, muscular strength and endurance. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 240. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture.

KN 345. Exercise Assessment and Programming. 3 hours.

Provides a variety of experiences in conducting advanced assessment and programming techniques and approaches to exercise, fitness, health and sport. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 136 and KN 240 and KN 243 and junior standing or above; or approval of the department. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture-Discussion.

KN 346. Advanced Strength and Conditioning Programming. 2 hours.

Allows students to develop their skills in program development in applied physical training for specific performance populations (athletes, military and health and safety workers). Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 136 and KN 240 and KN 345.

KN 350. Cadaver Dissection I. 1-3 hours.

Cadaver dissection using the regional approach. Dissection of the musculo-skeletal system, spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of B or better in KN 252 or consent of the instructor.

KN 351. Cadaver Dissection II. 1-3 hours.

Cadaver dissection using the regional approach method. Dissection of the brain, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of B or better in KN 252 or consent of instructor.

KN 352. Physiology of Exercise. 4 hours.

The physiological responses associated with acute and chronic physical exercise; muscular, circulatory, respiratory and nervous systems. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 252. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture-Discussion.

KN 361. Biomechanics: Introduction to the Human Machine. 3 hours.

Introduces the non-engineering/physics student to the science of mechanics with particular emphasis on the application of mechanics to the analysis of normal and pathological human and animal movement. Course Information: Previously listed as KN 260. Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 and KN 261, or consent of the instructor.

KN 372. Motor Control and Learning. 3 hours.

Introduction to basic principles regarding the acquisition and control of human movements. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100 and KN 252.

KN 393. Undergraduate Internship in Kinesiology. 3 or 6 hours.

This course will provide students with a working experience at a professional job site where they can apply the knowledge, skills and abilities they have learned in the program. Course Information: Field work required. Students must provide their own transportation to and from internship sites. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department and completion of all required courses for the chosen internship site.

KN 394. Special Topics in Kinesiology. 1-3 hours.

Flexible course structure designed to accommodate relevant topics beyond the scope of the current course offerings. Topic examples include muscle physiology, psychology of physical activity, biomechanics and motor control of special populations. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): KN 100; and sophomore standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

KN 395. Fieldwork in Applied Exercise Science and Health Promotion. 3 hours.

Students obtain supervised direct experience as well as conduct an applied Exercise Science and Health Promotion project. The program prepares students for the main areas of applied exercise science including fitness, health, exercise and sport. Course Information: Field work required. Prerequisite(s): KN 200; and KN 240; and consent of the instructor.

KN 396. Independent Study in Kinesiology. 1-3 hours.

Selected topics in Kinesiology for individual study. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor. Approval of student project by the KN 396 instructor and the supervising instructor.

KN 398. Senior Research Seminar. 3 hours.

An in-depth research analysis for the development of a research proposal in the student's area of interest. Review current literature, investigate various research methodologies, review the relevant research policies, and develop a proposed project. Course Information: Field work may be required. Students successfully completing KN 398 and maintaining a cumulative GPA of 3.25 are eligible to take KN 399 and complete their senior project. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or above and a grade point average of 3.25 or higher and approval of the department.

KN 399. Senior Research Project. 3 hours.

The implementation of the proposal developed in KN 398. Data collection, analysis and interpretation will provide the basis for the written project. The project will be presented in an open forum to faculty and other students. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 398, senior standing, and a cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or above.

KN 400. Entrepreneurship for Applied Health Professionals. 3 hours.

Relates the theory, principles and practices applied in entrepreneurial start-up settings in healthcare and human performance professions. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above.

KN 401. Clinical Skills in Kinesiology. 3 hours.

Builds, reviews, and assesses the clinical proficiencies in the areas of exercise assessment, testing, and programming; strength and conditioning training; health and nutritional coaching; and basic care of musculoskeletal injuries. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): HN 296 and KN 331 and KN 335 and KN 345. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory.

KN 402. Worksite Health Promotion. 3 hours.

Introduces students to evidence based worksite health promotion programs at two levels 1) program design, delivery and evaluation, 2) program management so that they develop skills and capabilities for the field of worksite health promotion. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 400.

KN 410. Aging and the Motor System. 3 hours.

Introduction to aging with a focus on its impact on the physical structure and function of the neural, muscular and skeletal systems; the mechanics through which the trajectory of aging can be potentially modified. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 252; and junior standing or above.

KN 431. Lower Extremity Overuse Injury. 3 hours.

Critical review of the literature related to lower extremity overuse injury; current practices and research gaps in the prevention and treatment of these injuries; movement assessment and corrective exercise to prevent and care of these injuries. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 261 and KN 331. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory.

KN 435. Sport Psychology for Individual and Team Performance. 3 hours.

Analysis and application of psychological concepts related to process and outcomes of sport and exercise programs. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 335.

KN 436. Health Coaching. 3 hours.

Enables students to practice and plan alternative approaches to health coaching, and to differentiate and evaluate two different health coaching approaches. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 335; and senior standing or above.

KN 437. Motivational Interviewing Lab. 1 hour.

Builds on the knowledge gained in KN 436 and focuses on developing proficiency in motivational interviewing. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 436.

KN 438. Exercise Adherence. 3 hours.

Exercise behavior as it relates to habitual physical activity. Encompasses health outcomes, exercise adherence factors, intervention, strategies, and exercise settings.

KN 441. Muscle Physiology. 3 hours.

Examination of skeletal muscle function during physical activity and adaptations of skeletal muscle that occur with exercise training, inactivity and aging. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 352 and junior standing or above; or consent of the instructor.

KN 442. Principles of ECG Interpretation. 3 hours.

Introduction to the basic principles and interpretation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) as it relates to fitness programs involving the apparently healthy as well as cardiac rehabilitation patients. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in KN 352; and junior standing or above; or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture/Discussion and one Laboratory.

KN 448. Modifications in Exercise Programming. 3 hours.

This course examines the criteria for exercise and fitness participation and the modifications necessary to benefit people with limiting physical conditions. Course Information: Previously listed as KN 348. Prerequisite(s): KN 345 and junior standing or above.

KN 450. Advanced Strength and Conditioning. 3 hours.

Students develop the required knowledge and competencies to complete professional credential examinations with nationally and internationally recognized organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 200 and KN 252 and KN 335 and KN 345 and KN 361. Graduate Students must obtain consent of instructor.

KN 452. Advanced Exercise Physiology. 3 hours.

Review of research in exercise physiology on topics currently addressed in the research literature. The first half of the semester will address factors affecting performance. The second half will address health and disease factors. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 352; and junior standing or above and one college-level course in chemistry.

KN 460. Neuromechanical Basis of Human Movement. 3 hours.

Biomechanics of single and multi-joint systems, and its role in neural control of movement. Mechanisms of acute adaptations including warm-up, fatigue and potentiation, and chronic adaptations arising from reduced use or training. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 252 and KN 361 and junior standing or above; or consent of the instructor.

KN 465. Biomechanics of the Neuromusculoskeletal Systems. 3 hours.

Introduces the non-engineering/physics student to the biomechanics of the neural, muscular and skeletal systems. The course focuses on normal structure-function of tissues and joints, injury and prevention. Course Information: Previously listed as KN 365. Prerequisite(s): KN 361 or one year of college physics; or consent of the instructor.

KN 472. Movement Neuroscience. 3 hours.

Overview of the human nervous system. Emphasis is placed on the basic functional anatomical and physiological concepts relevent to the organization and execution of movement. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): KN 251 and KN 252 and KN 352 and KN 372; and junior standing or above; or consent of the instructor.

KN 475. Movement Disorders. 3 hours.

Examines basic and applied understanding of the neural changes in motor function in disease and disorders of movement. This will include peripheral and central motor deficits. Prerequisite(s): KN 352 and KN 372; and junior standing or above.

KN 481. Workshop in Kinesiology. 1-3 hours.

Intensified study of selected activities, topics, processes or areas in kinesiology. Topic will be announced. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

KN 489. Seminars in Kinesiology. 1-3 hours.

Weekly seminars devoted to research in kinesiology and related fields, followed by a one-hour discussion. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above.

KN 493. Practicum in Undergraduate Teaching. 1-2 hours.

Peer instruction experience for undergraduate students. Course Information: May be repeated for credit. Students may register for more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Students must have successfully completed the course, or its equivalent, that they are teaching with a grade of B or better, in addition to obtaining consent of the instructor. Recommended Background: Junior or senior standing and an overall GPA of 3.00.

KN 494. Special Topics in Kinesiology. 1-3 hours.

Flexible course structure designed to accommodate relevant topics beyond the scope of the current course offerings, with more in-depth analysis of primary literature. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Depending on topic, specific prerequisites may be required.

KN 496. Special Projects in Kinesiology. 1-3 hours.

Independent research on special projects. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Approval by graduate faculty member and graduate director.