Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science

Introduction

Mathematics is the language of the sciences and of all fields where patterns and systematic processes need to be analyzed. The study of the various mathematical sciences involves learning ideas and techniques essential for the natural and social sciences and is increasingly important in all areas of a technological society.

Occupational fields open to students who have completed one of the curricula or majors in the department include mathematical analysis in industry or government, teaching, research, actuarial (insurance) work, computer programming and other statistical work, and mathematical aspects of business and finance.

The Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Science with a Major in Mathematics, the Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Mathematics, and the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Computer Science, and the Bachelor of Science with a Major in Statistics. A Minor in Mathematics and a Minor in Mathematics and Computer Science are also offered. Each major is assigned a department advisor who approves the student’s choice of courses.

Transfer Students

A transfer student majoring in one of these programs must successfully complete at least half of the mathematics courses in residence at UIC. For the BS with a Major in Mathematics, at least 12 semester hours must be at the advanced level; for the BS in Mathematics and Computer Science, 14 semester hours must be upper division. No transfer course below calculus may be counted toward the BS with a Major in Mathematics, the BS in the Teaching of Mathematics, the BS in Mathematics and Computer Science, or the BS with a Major in Statistics. Only grades of A, B, or C in calculus and above from other colleges and universities will be accepted for transfer credit.

Admission Requirements

Students must have concurrent registration in MATH 180, or equivalent standing, as a requirement for declaration of a major in any departmental program.

Distinction

For consideration, the student must have a minimum of a 3.50/4.00 GPA in upper-division courses in the department. The department may award High and Highest Distinction in recognition of outstanding academic achievement.

Computer Science Courses

CS 100. Discovering Computer Science. 3 hours.

Fundamentals of computing; history of computation; computer organization; program design, testing and debugging; web design; computer animation; software tools; societal and legal issues in computing. Course Information: Credit is not given for CS 100 if the student has credit in either CS 101 or MCS 260. No graduation credit for students enrolled in a major offered by the Departments of Computer Science or Electrical and Computer Engineering. Extensive computer use required. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture-Discussion. Natural World - No Lab course.

CS 107. Introduction to Computing and Programming. 4 hours.

Access and use of computing resources. Programming and program design. Problem solving. Data types, control structures, modularity, information hiding. Course Information: Credit is not given for CS 107 if the student has credit for CS 102. Previously listed as EECS 171. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in MATH 180. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture.

CS 109. C/C ++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab. 3 hours.

Program design using C/C++: Data types and operators, control structures, functions, file I/O, arrays and structures. Engineering applications: Matrices, equation solution, MatLab. Programming assignments. Course Information: Credit is not given for CS 109 if the student has credit for CS 110. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in MATH 180. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

CS 110. MATLAB Programming for Engineers. 1 hour.

Program design and problem solving using MATLAB. Numeric computation, control structures, vectors, matrices, file I/O, data analysis, visualization. Engineering applications; programming assignments. Course Imformation: Credit is not given for CS 110 if the student has credit for CS 109. Extensive computer use required. Meets 3 days each week for 5 weeks of the semester. Prerequisite(s): CS 107 or CS 111; or appropriate score on the department placement test.

CS 111. Program Design I. 3 hours.

Introduction to programming: control structures; variables and data types; problem decomposition and procedural programming; input and output; aggregate data structures including arrays; programming exercises. Course Information: 3 hours. Previously listed as CS 101. Extensive computer use required. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture-Discussion.

CS 141. Program Design II. 3 hours.

Data abstraction and modular design; recursion; lists and stacks; dynamic memory allocation; file manipulation; programming exercises. Course Information: 3 hours. Previously listed as CS 102. Extensive computer use required. Credit is not given for CS 141 if the student has credit for CS 102 or CS 107. Prerequisite(s): CS 109 or CS 111; and credit or concurrent registration in MATH 180. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

CS 151. Mathematical Foundations of Computing. 3 hours.

Discrete mathematics concepts fundamental to computing: propositional logic, predicates and quantifiers; proofs; sets; recursive definitions and induction; functions, relations and graphs; combinatorics and discrete probability; applications. Course Information: 3 hours. Credit is not given for CS 151 if the student has credit in MCS 361. Prerequisite(s): MATH 180; and Grade of C or better in CS 111. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion.

CS 201. Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics I. 4 hours.

Lists, stacks, queues, sets, hash tables, introduction to trees and graphs. Algorithm correctness and complexity, inductive proofs, logic. Programming projects. Course Information: Previously listed as EECS 260. Credit is not given for CS 201 if the student has credit for MCS 261. Prerequisite(s): MATH 180; and grade of C or better in CS 102 or grade of C or better in CS 107.

CS 211. Programming Practicum. 2 hours.

Software development tools and practices; debugging and testing; advanced language features; standard libraries; code management. Course Information: 2 hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in CS 141. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory-Discussion.

CS 251. Data Structures. 4 hours.

Design, usage and analysis of data structures: review of lists, stacks and queues; hash tables, priority queues, search trees, introduction to graphs; searching and sorting; runtime analysis; programming projects and lab exercises. Course Information: 4 hours. Credit is not given for CS 251 if the student has credit in CS 202. Prerequisite (s): CS 151 or CS 201; and credit or concurrent registration in CS 211. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory.

CS 261. Machine Organization. 3 hours.

Data representation and computer arithmetic; machine language; addressing; memory hierarchy; subroutines; data structures; processor architecture: hardwdare components, pipelining. Course Information: 3 hours. Credit is not given for CS 261 if the student has credit for CS 366 or ECE 267 or ECE 366. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in CS 211. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory.

CS 301. Languages and Automata. 3 hours.

Regular sets and finite automata. Context-free languages and push-down automata. Parsing. Computability theory including Turing machines and decidability. Course Information: Previously listed as EECS 361. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in CS 151 or grade of C or better in CS 201; and credit or concurrent registration in CS 251. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture.

CS 341. Programming Language Design and Implementation. 3 hours.

Programming language paradigms, design and implementation: syntax and semantics; parsing; runtime systems; control; data types; subroutines and exceptions; data and procedural abstraction; functional programming. Course Information: Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): CS 251 and CS 261; or approval of the department. Credit is not given for CS 341 if the student has credit in CS 473 or CS 476.

CS 342. Software Design. 3 hours.

Software design principles and practices: Object-oriented design; design patterns; software reuse; testing; event driven programming and concurrency; graphical user interface design and development; Team development. Course Information: Extensive computer use required. Credit is not given for CS 342 if the student has credit for CS 340. Prerequisite(s): CS 251.

CS 361. Computer Systems. 3 hours.

Study of computer systems emphasizing impact on application level programming. Virtual memory and memory management; code optimization; system-level I/O; concurrency: processes, threads, synchronization; introduction to network programming. Course Information: 3 hours. Extensive computer use required. Credit Restrictions: Credit is not given for CS 361 if the student has credit for CS 366 or ECE 366. Prerequisite(s): CS 251 and CS 261. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory.

CS 362. Computer Design. 3 hours.

Computer hardware building blocks. logic gates; combinational circuits; arithmetic circuits; flip flops and sequential circuits; registers and memory; CPU design; I/O design. Course Information: 3 hours. Extensive computer use required. Credit is not given for CS 362 if the student has credit in CS 266 or ECE 265. Prerequisite(s): CS 261. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory.

CS 377. Communication and Ethical Issues in Computing. 3 hours.

Communication skills for computing professionals: presentation organization, visual aides, delivery techniques, argument support. Ethical and societal issues in computing: privacy, intellectual property and ownership, crime. Course Information: 3 hours. Extensive computer use required. Credit is not given for CS 377 if the student has credit in CS 335 or CS 376. Prerequisite(s): CS 251. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory-Discussion.

CS 385. Operating Systems Concepts and Design. 3 hours.

Principles of operating systems. Effective management of machine resources: resource allocation and scheduling, mutual exclusion, deadlock avoidance, memory management policies, devices and file systems, client-server systems, virtualization. Course Information: Previously listed as EECS 371. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): CS 361; or CS 201 and ECE 267.

CS 398. Undergraduate Design/Research. 3 hours.

Design and/or research experience for undergraduate Computer Science majors under close supervision of a CS faculty member. Course Information: Previously listed as EECS 398. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

CS 401. Computer Algorithms I. 3 or 4 hours.

Design and analysis of computer algorithms. Divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy method, backtracking. Algorithms for sorting, searching, graph computations, pattern matching, NP-complete problems. Course Information: Same as MCS 401. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MCS 360; or Grade of C or better in CS 202.

CS 411. Artificial Intelligence I. 3 or 4 hours.

Problem representation; rule-based problem-solving methods; heuristic search techniques. Application to expert systems, theorem proving, language understanding. Individual projects. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CS 251.

CS 412. Introduction to Machine Learning. 3 or 4 hours.

Theory and implementation of systems that improve automatically based on past experience, including classification, density estimation, clustering, and online learning tasks and solutions. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. MATLAB will be used for some of the homework assignments, but prior experience with it is not required. Prerequisite(s): CS 251; and IE 342 or STAT 381; or consent of the instructor.

CS 415. Computer Vision I. 3 or 4 hours.

Computer vision system design. Segmentation and representation of regions and boundaries; image filtering; object recognition; advanced topics (examples: texture, stereo, color); applications. Programming assignments. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Previously listed as EECS 487. Prerequisite(s): CS 202 or MCS 360; or consent of the instructor.

CS 421. Natural Language Processing. 3 or 4 hours.

Design of natural language processing systems; part-of speech tagging, statistical and symbolic parsers; semantic interpretation; discourse and dialogue processing; natural language generation; applications. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CS 301 or MCS 441.

CS 422. User Interface Design and Programming. 3 or 4 hours.

User interface design, implementation, and evaluation: user-centered design methodologies, windowing systems, I/O devices and techniques, event-loop programming, user studies. Programming projects. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CS 342.

CS 424. Visualization and Visual Analytics. 3 or 4 hours.

Geospatial visualization, scientific visualization, medical visualization, information visualization, and social network visualization, interaction, data analysis, human factors, dynamic data, privacy, uncertainty, data transforms. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): CS 251; or graduate standing; or consent of the instructor.

CS 425. Computer Graphics I. 0-4 hours.

Principles of interactive computer graphics. Raster and vector display, techniques and hardware considerations. Introduction to two-dimensional and three dimensional rendering. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Previously listed as CS 488. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): CS 251. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

CS 426. Video Game Design and Development. 3 or 4 hours.

Theory and practice of video game design and programming. Students will form interdisciplinary teams, to design, build and demonstrate video games or related interactive simulation environments. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CS 251 or consent of the instructor.

CS 440. Software Engineering I. 3 or 4 hours.

Software life-cycle model, requirement specification techniques, large-scale software design techniques and tools, implementation issues, testing and debugging techniques, software maintenance. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Previously listed as EECS 470. Prerequisite(s): CS 342.

CS 441. Engineering Distributed Objects For Cloud Computing. 3 or 4 hours.

Provides a broad but solid overview of engineering distributed object for cloud computing. Students will learn the theory and principles of engineering distributed objects for cloud environments. Programming assignments required. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in CS 341 or Grade of C or better in CS 342; and Grade of C or better in CS 361.

CS 442. Software Engineering II. 3 or 4 hours.

Advanced concepts in software development: requirements engineering, cost estimation, risk analysis, extreme programming, regression test case selection, and design patterns. Software lab assignments required. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): CS 440.

CS 450. Introduction to Networking. 3 or 4 hours.

Network protocols, algorithms, and software issues. Topics include the Open Systems Interconnect model, data link, network and transport layers, TCP/IP, ATM, mobile networks. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for CS 450 if the student has credit for ECE 433. Prerequisite(s): CS 361.

CS 455. Design and Implementation of Network Protocols. 3 or 4 hours.

Network protocols and their software, Examines OS network interface through network layers. Topics include routing, congestion control, fault tolerance, security, name servers, multicast, and performance. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CS 340 and CS 450.

CS 466. Advanced Computer Architecture. 3 or 4 hours.

Design and analysis of high performance uniprocessors. Topics include arithmetic: multiplication, division, shifting; processor: pipelining, multiple function units. instruction sets; memory: caches, modules; virtual machines. Course Information: Same as ECE 466. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): ECE 366 or CS 366.

CS 469. Computer Systems Design. 3 or 4 hours.

Analysis and modeling of digital systems; hardware description languages; CAD tools for simulation, synthesis, and verification of computer systems. Project: a simple processor design. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Same as ECE 469. Prerequisite(s): CS 366; or ECE 366 and ECE 368.

CS 473. Compiler Design. 3 or 4 hours.

Language translation: lexical analysis, parsing schemes, symbol table management, syntax and semantic error detection, and code generation. Development of fully-functional compiler. Course Information: Same as MCS 411. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in CS 301 or grade of C or better in MCS 441; and grade of C or better in CS 202 or grade of C or better in MCS 360; and grade of C or better in CS 266.

CS 474. Object-Oriented Languages and Environments. 3 or 4 hours.

Data abstraction, classes and objects, messages and methods, polymorphism and dynamic binding, inheritance. Object-oriented design. Pure and hybrid object-oriented languages. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Previously listed as EECS 474. Prerequisite(s): CS 340.

CS 475. Object-Oriented Programming. 3 or 4 hours.

OO Paradigm: classes, messages, methods, variables, inheritance, polymorphism; the C++ and Java languages; programming labs required. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for CS 475 if the student has credit for CS 340 or CS 474. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): CS 202; and consent of the instructor.

CS 476. Programming Language Design. 3 or 4 hours.

Definition, design, and implementation of programming languages. Syntactic and semantic description; variable bindings, control and data structures, parsing, code generation, optimization; exception handling; data abstraction. Course Information: Same as MCS 415. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Previously listed as EECS 476. Prerequisite(s): MCS 360 or CS 340.

CS 477. Public Policy, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing, Privacy, and Security. 3 or 4 hours.

Contemporary topics involving legal, public policy, and/or ethical issues in computing, especially privacy, security, and surveillance. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

CS 478. Software Development for Mobile Platforms. 3 or 4 hours.

Design and implementation of mobile applications; operating systems, object-oriented languages and programming environments for mobile platforms; integration with hardware components; and location-aware applications. Programming assignments required. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): CS 342.

CS 480. Database Systems. 3 or 4 hours.

Database design, logical design, physical design. Relational databases. Recovery, concurrency control. Normalization. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CS 251.

CS 485. Networked Operating Systems Programming. 4 or 5 hours.

Concepts, design, and programming of multi-process and distributed systems; inter-process communications; fault tolerance; distributed programming semantics. Programming assignments and project required. Course Information: 4 undergraduate hours. 5 graduate hours. Previously listed as EECS 471. Prerequisite(s): CS 385.

CS 486. Secure Operating System Design and Implementation. 3 or 4 hours.

Design of operating systems; operating system kernel implementation; secure coding and systems; virtual machines; extensive programming in a systems language such as C. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in CS 385; and credit or concurrent registration in CS 450 or consent of the instructor.

CS 487. Building Secure Computer Systems. 3 or 4 hours.

Building and programming secure systems; protecting systems from threats and reduction of vulnerabilities; Includes application, host and network security. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in CS 385; and senior standing or above; or consent of the instructor.

CS 489. Human Augmentics. 3 or 4 hours.

Study of technologies for augmentation of human capabilities; human limitations; implants and wearable technologies; implants; brain-computer interfaces; exoskeletons; sensors and networks. Includes project work. Course Information: Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or above; or consent of the instructor; or senior majoring in communications or psychology.

CS 491. Seminar. 1-4 hours.

Topics of mutual interest to a faculty member and a group of students. Offered as announced by department bulletin or the Timetable. Course Information: May be repeated. Previously listed as EECS 491. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

CS 493. Special Problems. 2-4 hours.

Special problems or reading by special arrangement with the faculty. Course Information: Previously listed as EECS 493. No graduate credit for Computer Science majors. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

CS 499. Professional Development Seminar. 0 hours.

Graduating seniors will be provided with information regarding future career paths and will provide information regarding the program to be used for assessment purposes. Students take the CS Major Field Exam as part of this course. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Open only to seniors; and approval of the department. Must be taken in the student's last semester of study.

Mathematics Teaching Courses

MTHT 400. Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics I. 3 or 4 hours.

Philosophies, issues, techniques, and styles of teaching high school mathematics. Implications of psychological models. Mathematics in the evolving curriculum. Preparation of lessons. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. To be taken in the year prior to student teaching. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MTHT 410, enrollment in B.S. or M.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics program in Secondary Mathematics Education, and a 2.50 grade point average in mathematics courses at the level of calculus or above.

MTHT 401. Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics II. 3 or 4 hours.

Philosophies, issues, techniques and styles of teaching high school mathematics. Preparation of diverse lessons. Supervised teaching experience. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. To be taken in year prior to student teaching. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 210 and enrollment in the B.S. or M.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics program in Secondary Mathematics Education; and a 2.50 grade point average in mathematics courses at the level of calculus or above.

MTHT 411. Advanced Euclidean Geometry. 3 or 4 hours.

Axioms for Euclidean geometry are developed based upon reflections. Further concepts in Euclidean geometry which arise from these axioms are explored. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 215.

MTHT 420. Computers in Secondary School Mathematics. 3 or 4 hours.

An overview of techniques, topics and tools for teaching secondary level mathematics using computers. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

MTHT 430. Mathematical Analysis for Teachers I. 3 or 4 hours.

Basic properties of numbers, functions, graphs, limits, differentiation, continuity, completeness of the system of real numbers. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 210 and Grade of C or better in MATH 215.

MTHT 435. Abstract Algebra. 3 or 4 hours.

Sets, properties of integers, groups, rings, fields. Focus on concepts applicable to high school teaching. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): MATH 210 and MATH 215.

MTHT 438. Educational Practice with Seminar I. 6 hours.

The first half of a two-segment sequence of practice teaching, including seminar, to meet certification requirements for teaching in grades six through twelve. Course Information: Graduate credit only with approval of the department. Prerequisite(s): 2.50 grade point average in mathematics courses at the level of calculus or above, successful completion of 100 clock hours of pre-student-teaching field experiences, and approval of the department. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.

MTHT 439. Educational Practice with Seminar II. 6 hours.

The second half of a two-segment sequence of practice teaching, including seminar, to meet certification requirements for teaching in grades six through twelve. Course Information: Graduate credit only with approval of the department. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in MTHT 438; and approval of the department and a 2.50 grade point average in mathematics courses at the level of calculus or above and successful completion of 100 clock hours of pre-student teaching field experiences. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Conference and one Practice.

MTHT 450. Concepts and Methods in Elementary and Middle School Mathematics I. 3 or 4 hours.

Advanced analysis of concept development and teaching methods. Sorting, classifying, counting, number tracks, addition, subtraction, group, place value, length, area and alternative teaching strategies. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. For elementary school teachers. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing and admission to the M.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics program (Option for Elementary School Teachers) or consent of the instructor.

MTHT 460. Geometric Measurement and Numerical Methods. 3 or 4 hours.

Classical problems of length, area and volume, including numerical trigonometry, are explored using a scientific calculator. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Do not purchase a calculator for the course until after the first day of class. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the M.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics program (Option for Elementary School Teachers) or consent of the instructor.

MTHT 465. Teaching Algebra for Understanding. 3 or 4 hours.

Manipulatives and other representations of mathematical concepts used for teaching algebra to middle grade students. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the M.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics program (Option for Elementary School Teachers) or consent of the instructor.

MTHT 466. Introduction to Calculus and the Graphing Calculator. 4 hours.

Problem solving using derivatives, differentials, and their applications followed by integrals and their applications. Maximumminimum problems solved directly by graphing, then by derivatives. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Mathematics Education Concentrators Program or consent of the instructor.

MTHT 467. Introduction to Number Theory with Application. 4 hours.

Classical topics of elementary number theory and how they pertain to teaching the upper grades. Primes, GCF, LCM, divisibility, floor and ceiling functions, Gaussian Residue, lattices. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Mathematics Education Concentrators Program or consent of the instructor.

MTHT 468. Geometry with Applications for Middle Grade Teachers. 4 hours.

Plane and solid figures and their properties. Polygons and polyhedra. Euler's formula. Volume versus surface area. Spacial visualization; two dimensional representations of three dimensional figures. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Mathematics Education Concentrators Program or consent of the instructor.

MTHT 470. Teaching Mathematics with Science: An Activity Approach I. 3 or 4 hours.

Introduction to basic variables (length, area, volume, mass, time) and the Scientific Method (picture, table, graph, questions). Extensive use of TIMS project curriculum. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. For elementary school teachers. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the M.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics program (Option for Elementary School Teachers) or consent of the instructor.

MTHT 480. Microcomputers in Elementary School Mathematics I. 3 or 4 hours.

Introduction to microcomputers and their use in elementary school mathematics. Basic microcomputer functions, educational software programs, pedagogical and curricular implications, and implementation questions. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. For elementary school teachers. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the M.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics program (Option for Elementary School Teachers) or consent of the instructor.

MTHT 490. Topics in Teaching Secondary Mathematics. 1-5 hours.

Course content is announced prior to each term in which it is given. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites may vary according to topic.

MTHT 491. Topics in Teaching Elementary/Junior High School Mathematics. 1-5 hours.

Course content is announced prior to each term in which it is given. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites may vary according to topic.

MTHT 496. Independent Study. 1-4 hours.

Reading course supervised by a faculty member. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor and the department. Class Schedule Information: This course counts toward the limited number of independent study hours accepted toward the degree and the major.

Mathematics Courses

MATH 075. Beginning Algebra. 2 hours.

Linear equations and inequalities, functions, linear functions, slope, exponents, polynomials, quadratic equations, rational expressions, rational equations, and applications. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Not open to students with credit in Math 070, 090, or a mathematics course at or above the 100-level. No graduation credit. Prerequisite(s): Appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Thursday of finals week from 1 to 3 p.m.

MATH 088. Intermediate Algebra Workshop. 1 hour.

Individualized lesson plans including: order of operations, properties of real numbers, linear equations, problem solving, graphing linear equations. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. No graduation credit. Extensive computer use required. Corequisites: Requires concurrent registration in MATH 090.

MATH 090. Intermediate Algebra. 4 hours.

Linear equations and inequalities, absolute values, linear graphs and modeling, systems of equations, functions, quadratic equations, exponents and polynomials, factoring, radicals and rational exponents. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Not open to students with credit in a mathematics course at or above the 100 level. No graduation credit. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): MATH 075; or credit or concurrent registration in MATH 088; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Wednesday of finals week from 6 to 8 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

MATH 110. College Algebra. 4 hours.

Functions, composition and inverses; graphs and transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential functions, logarithms and applications; circles and introduction to trigonometry. Course Information: Credit is not given for MATH 110 if the student has credit in MATH 121 or MATH 165 or MATH 175 or MATH 180. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): MATH 090; or appropriate score on the department placement test. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory-Discussion.

MATH 118. Mathematical Reasoning. 5 hours.

Elementary topics from algebra applied to descriptive statistics of data, scatter plots, correlation, linear regression, probability, random samples, sampling distributions, experimental designs. Graphing calculator used. Course Information: No credit given if the student has credit in MATH 150 or 160 or 165 or 180, or the equivalent. No credit given if the student has credit in MATH 121 with a grade of C or better. No graduation credit for architecture, business administration, or engineering students. The only mathematics department course for which MATH 118 serves as a prerequisite is MATH 123. It may serve as a preprequisite for statistics courses in the social sciences. It does not replace MATH 090 as a prerequisite for any other mathematics department course. Prerequisite(s): MATH 070, or MATH 075, or appropriate performance on the UIC mathematics placement test. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture.

MATH 121. Precalculus Mathematics. 5 hours.

Functions, graphs, exponentials and logarithms, radicals, complex numbers, trigonometry (circle and triangle approaches), trigonometric graphs and inverses, introduction to polar coordinates and vectors Course Information: No credit will be given for MATH 121 if students have credit in MATH 165 or MATH 170 or MATH 180. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 110; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Thursday of finals week from 6 to 8 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

MATH 122. Emerging Scholars Workshop for Precalculus Mathematics. 1 hour.

Intensive math workshop for students enrolled in MATH 121. Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Emerging Scholars Program. Must enroll concurrently in MATH 121.

MATH 125. Elementary Linear Algebra. 5 hours.

Introduction to systems of linear equations, matrices and vector spaces, with emphasis on business applications. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): MATH 090; or MATH 110; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion. During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Thursday of finals week from 6 to 8 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Natural World - No Lab course.

MATH 140. Arithmetic and Algebraic Structures. 4 hours.

Problem solving; algebraic thinking; number systems; numeration; number theory; mathematical operations over natural, integer, and rational numbers; and proportional reasoning. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): MATH 090; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Monday of finals week from 6 to 8 p.m.

MATH 141. Algebraic and Geometric Structures. 4 hours.

Area, perimeter, volume, surface area of plane and solid figures; integers, real and rational numbers; trigonometry and extended solution of general polygons; probability. Full purpose calculators used. Course Information: Designed for students in the B.A. in Elementary Education program. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 140. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Tuesday of finals week from 6 to 8 p.m.

MATH 160. Finite Mathematics for Business. 5 hours.

Introduction to probability, statistics, and matrices, with emphasis on business applications. Course Information: MATH 090; or Grade of C or better in MATH 110; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Thursday of finals week from 6 to 8 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Natural World - No Lab course.

MATH 165. Calculus for Business. 5 hours.

Introduction to differential and integral calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions and techniques of partial derivatives and optimization. Emphasis on business applications. Course Information: Credit is not given for MATH 165 if the student has credit for MATH 180. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 110; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Wednesday of finals week from 6 to 8 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Natural World - No Lab course.

MATH 170. Calculus for the Life Sciences. 4 hours.

Introduction to calculus with applications to the life sciences, mathematical modeling, differentiation, integration and applications. Course Information: Credit is not given for MATH 170 if the student has credit for MATH 165 or MATH 180. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 110 or Grade of C or better in MATH 121; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion. Natural World - No Lab course.

MATH 179. Emerging Scholars Workshop for Calculus I. 1 hour.

Intensive math workshop for students enrolled in MATH 180. Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Emerging Scholars Program. Must enroll concurrently in MATH 180.

MATH 180. Calculus I. 4 hours.

Differentiation, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, related rates, mean-value theorem, antiderivative, Riemann integral, logarithm, and exponential functions. Course Information: Credit is not given for MATH 180 if the student has credit for MATH 165 or MATH 170. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 121 or appropriate performance on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Thursday of finals week from 1 to 3 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Natural World - No Lab course.

MATH 181. Calculus II. 4 hours.

Techniques of integration, arc length, solids of revolution, applications, polar coordinates, parametric equations, infinite sequences and series, power series. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 180. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Thursday of finals week from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Natural World - No Lab course.

MATH 182. Emerging Scholars Workshop for Calculus II. 1 hour.

Intensive math workshop for students enrolled in MATH 181. Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Emerging Scholars Program. Must enroll concurrently in MATH 181.

MATH 194. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-4 hours.

Course content is announced prior to each term in which it is given. Course Information: May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department.

MATH 210. Calculus III. 3 hours.

Vectors in space, functions of several variables, partial differential and optimization, multiple integrals, vector fields, Green?s Theorem, Stokes Theorem. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 181. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Thursday of finals week from 1 to 3 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion and one Lecture. Natural World - No Lab course.

MATH 211. Emerging Scholars Workshop for Calculus III. 1 hour.

Intensive math workshop for students enrolled in MATH 210. Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems. Course Information: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Emerging Scholars Program. Must enroll concurrently in MATH 210.

MATH 215. Introduction to Advanced Mathematics. 3 hours.

Introduction to methods of proofs used in different fields in mathematics. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 181 and approval of the department.

MATH 220. Introduction to Differential Equations. 3 hours.

Techniques and applications of differential equations, first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions, graphical and numerical methods, and partial differential equations. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 210. Class Schedule Information: During the fall and spring terms, combined section final exam will be held on Thursday of finals week from 6 to 8 p.m. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

MATH 294. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-4 hours.

Course content is announced prior to each term in which it is given. Course Information: May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department.

MATH 300. Writing for Mathematics. 1 hour.

Fulfills Writing-in-the-Discipline requirement. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161 or the equivalent, and a grade of C or better in MATH 210. Students must have declared a major in the Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science Department.

MATH 310. Applied Linear Algebra. 3 hours.

Matrices, Gaussian elimination, vector spaces, LU-decomposition, orthogonality, Gram-Schmidt process, determinants, inner products, eigenvalue problems, applications to differential equations and Markov processes. Course Information: Credit is not given for MATH 310 if the student has credit for MATH 320. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

MATH 313. Analysis I. 3 hours.

The real number system, limits, continuous functions, differentiability, the Riemann integral. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 215 or consent of the instructor.

MATH 320. Linear Algebra I. 3 hours.

Linear equations, Gaussian elimination, matrices, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Course Information: Credit is not given for MATH 320 if the student has credit for MATH 310. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 215.

MATH 330. Abstract Algebra I. 3 hours.

Sets, properties of integers, groups, rings, fields. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 215.

MATH 394. Special Topics in Mathematics. 2-4 hours.

Course content is announced prior to each term in which it is given. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department.

MATH 410. Advanced Calculus I. 3 or 4 hours.

Functions of several variables, differentials, theorems of partial differentiation. Calculus of vector fields, line and surface integrals, conservative fields, Stokes's and divergence theorems. Cartesian tensors. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

MATH 411. Advanced Calculus II. 3 or 4 hours.

Implicit and inverse function theorems, transformations, Jacobians. Point-set theory. Sequences, infinite series, convergence tests, uniform convergence. Improper integrals, gamma and beta functions, Laplace transform. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 410.

MATH 414. Analysis II. 3 or 4 hours.

Sequences and series of functions. Uniform convergence. Taylor's theorem. Topology of metric spaces, with emphasis on the real numbers. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 313.

MATH 417. Complex Analysis with Applications. 3 or 4 hours.

Complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, Taylor and Laurent series, residue calculus, branch cuts, conformal mapping, argument principle, Rouche's theorem, Poisson integral formula, analytic continuation. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade C or better in MATH 210.

MATH 419. Models in Applied Mathematics. 3 or 4 hours.

Introduction to mathematical modeling; scaling, graphical methods, optimization, computer simulation, stability, differential equation models, elementary numerical methods, applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and physics. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 220 and grade of C or better in MCS 260.

MATH 425. Linear Algebra II. 3 or 4 hours.

Canonical forms of a linear transformation, inner product spaces, spectral theorem, principal axis theorem, quadratic forms, special topics such as linear programming. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 320.

MATH 430. Formal Logic I. 3 or 4 hours.

First order logic, syntax and semantics, completeness-incompleteness. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for MATH 430 if the student has credit for PHIL 416. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in CS 202 or grade of C or better in MCS 261 or grade of C or better in MATH 215.

MATH 431. Abstract Algebra II. 3 or 4 hours.

Further topics in abstract algebra: Sylow Theorems, Galois Theory, finitely generated modules over a principal ideal domain. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 320 and grade of C or better in MATH 330.

MATH 435. Foundations of Number Theory. 3 or 4 hours.

Primes, divisibility, congruences, Chinese remainder theorem, primitive roots, quadratic residues, quadratic reciprocity, and Jacobi symbols. The Euclidean algorithm and strategies of computer programming. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 215.

MATH 436. Number Theory for Applications. 3 or 4 hours.

Primality testing methods of Lehmer, Rumely, Cohen-Lenstra, Atkin. Factorization methods of Gauss, Pollard, Shanks, Lenstra, and quadratic sieve. Computer algorithms involving libraries and nested subroutines. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 435.

MATH 442. Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces. 3 or 4 hours.

Frenet formulas, isoperimetric inequality, local theory of surfaces, Gaussian and mean curvature, geodesics, parallelism, and the Guass-Bonnet theorem. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 320.

MATH 445. Introduction to Topology I. 3 or 4 hours.

Elements of metric spaces and topological spaces including product and quotient spaces, compactness, connectedness, and completeness. Examples from Euclidean space and function spaces. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 313.

MATH 446. Introduction to Topology II. 3 or 4 hours.

Topics in topology chosen from the following: advanced point set topology, piecewise linear topology, fundamental group and knots, differential topology, applications to physics and biology. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 445.

MATH 480. Applied Differential Equations. 3 or 4 hours.

Linear first-order systems. Numerical methods. Nonlinear differential equations and stability. Introduction to partial differential equations. Sturm-Liouville theory. Boundary value problems and Green's functions. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 220.

MATH 481. Applied Partial Differential Equations. 3 or 4 hours.

Initial value and boundary value problems for second order linear equations. Eiqenfunction expansions and Sturm-Liouville theory. Green's functions. Fourier transform. Characteristics. Laplace transform. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 220.

MATH 494. Special Topics in Mathematics. 3 or 4 hours.

Course content is announced prior to each term in which it is given. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department.

MATH 496. Independent Study. 1-4 hours.

Reading course supervised by a faculty member. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor and the department. Class Schedule Information: This course counts toward the limited number of independent study hours accepted toward the degree and the major.

Statistics Courses

STAT 101. Introduction to Statistics. 4 hours.

Applications of statistics in the real world, displaying and describing data, normal curve, regression, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Course Information: Credit is not given for STAT 101 for majors in Mathematics & Computer Science, Mathematics, and Teaching of Mathematics and Statistics and Operations Research. Credit is not given for STAT 101 if the student has credit for STAT 130. Extensive computer use required. This course is offered in both a blended and traditional format. If the section is marked "Blended-Online and Classroom," use of a computer and internet access is required. Blended sections require students to do some of their coursework online. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisite(s): MATH 090; or Grade of C or better in MATH 110; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

STAT 130. Introduction to Statistics for the Life Sciences. 4 hours.

Basic concepts and methods of statistics with illustrations from different areas of the life sciences; graphical and summary representations, probability, random variables, normal distribution, estimation and tests of hypotheses, t, F and chi-square. Course Information: Credit is not given for STAT 130 if the student has credit for STAT 101. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 110; or Grade of C or better in MATH 121; or appropriate score on the department placement test.

STAT 361. Elements of Statistical Methods. 2 hours.

Graphical and numerical summaries of data, statistical software package use; introduction to probability, random variables, and sampling distributions; point estimation, confidence intervals, and test of hypotheses. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 181.

STAT 362. Elements of Statistical Computing. 2 hours.

Statistical computation with the SAS and R software packages; data structure, entry, and manipulation; numerical and graphical summaries; basic statistical methods. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in STAT 361.

STAT 381. Applied Statistical Methods I. 3 hours.

Graphical and tabular representation of data; Introduction to probability, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses. Includes SAS and SPSSX applications. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 210; or approval of the department.

STAT 382. Statistical Methods and Computing. 3 hours.

Statistical computation with the SAS and R software packages: data structure, entry, and manipulation; numerical and graphical summaries; basic statistical methods; select advanced methods. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): STAT 381.

STAT 401. Introduction to Probability. 3 or 4 hours.

Probability spaces, random variables and their distributions, conditional distribution and stochastic independence, special distributions, sampling distributions, limit theorems. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 210; or approval of the department.

STAT 411. Statistical Theory. 3 or 4 hours.

Estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses, best tests, sufficient statistics, Rao-Cramer inequality, sequential probability ratio tests, the multivariate normal distribution, nonparametric methods. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in STAT 401.

STAT 416. Nonparametric Statistical Methods. 3 or 4 hours.

Distribution free tests for location and dispersion problems, one-way and two-way layouts, the independence problem, regression problems involving slopes, detecting broad alternatives, resampling methods. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in STAT 381 or STAT 411.

STAT 431. Introduction to Survey Sampling. 3 or 4 hours.

Simple random sampling; sampling proportions; estimation of sample size; stratified random sampling; ratio estimators; regression estimators; systematic and cluster sampling. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in STAT 411 or STAT 481.

STAT 451. Computational Statistics. 3 or 4 hours.

Modern computationally-intensive statistical methods including Monte Carlo integration and simulation, optimization and maximum likelihood estimation, EM algorithm, MCMC, sampling and resampling methods, non-parametric density estimation. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): STAT 411.

STAT 461. Applied Probability Models I. 3 or 4 hours.

Computing probabilities and expectations by conditioning, Markov chains, Chapman-Kolmogorov equations, branching processes, Poisson processes and exponential distribution, continuous-time Markov chains, reversibility, uniformization. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in STAT 401.

STAT 471. Linear and Non-Linear Programming. 3 or 4 hours.

Linear programming, simplex algorithm, degeneracy, duality theorem sensitivity analysis, convexity, network simplex methods, assignment problems. Constrained and unconstrained minima. Quasi-Newton methods. Ellipsoidal methods of Kachian. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 310.

STAT 473. Game Theory. 3 or 4 hours.

Introduction to the basic ideas of game theory. Static and dynamic games; mixed strategies, imperfect information; economic, political and biological applications. Course Information: Same as ECON 473. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): STAT 381; or ECON 270; or equivalents.

STAT 475. Mathematics and Statistics for Actuarial Sciences I. 3 or 4 hours.

Financial mathematics as it pertains to the valuation of deterministic cash flows. Basic concepts and techniques regarding the theory of interest. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): MATH 210.

STAT 481. Applied Statistical Methods II. 3 or 4 hours.

Linear regression, introduction to model building, analysis of variance, analysis of enumerative data, nonparametric statistics, product and system reliability, quality control. SAS and SPSSX applications. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in STAT 381.

STAT 486. Statistical Consulting. 3 or 4 hours.

Introduction to statistical consulting methods and techniques. Handling and transformation of raw data sets in CMS. Statistical analysis of data sets with SAS and SPSSX. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in STAT 411 or STAT 481.

STAT 494. Special Topics in Statistics, Probability and Operations Research. 3 or 4 hours.

Course content announced prior to each semester in which it is given. Topics drawn from areas such as distribution theory; Bayesian inference; discrete optimization; applied probability models; resampling techniques; biostatistics; environmental sampling. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department.

STAT 496. Independent Study. 1-4 hours.

Reading course supervised by a faculty member. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor and approval of the department.