College of Pharmacy


Introduction

Founded in 1859, the University of Illinois College of Pharmacy is currently the 3rd oldest college of pharmacy in the nation and the oldest college in the entire University of Illinois system. It has a long distinguished legacy for excellence in education and research and is considered one of the very best colleges of pharmacy in the U.S. The college’s six-story building provides classrooms, multimedia lecture halls and auditoriums, research, teaching, and dispensing laboratories. Additional laboratory research labs are located in the Molecular Biology Research building. A learning resources center including up-to-date computers is housed in the college. A lounge and locker space are available for student use.

In addition to its educational activities, the College of Pharmacy provides clinical and distributive services to patients seeking care at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System. This service function is coupled with the educational programs of the college to provide maximum exposure to contemporary pharmacy practice. Inpatient, outpatient, and satellite pharmacies in community health centers are part of the network of pharmacy services in which the college is engaged. The college is also home to a vibrant research community with investigators working on developing new drugs and understanding their mechanism of action.

In direct response to a shortage of pharmacists in Illinois and the need to train pharmacists to practice throughout the state of Illinois, the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy created the University of Illinois College of Pharmacy at Rockford as a regional campus. The Rockford campus is located on 20 park-like acres in a residential area of Rockford near the Rock River. The campus opened in 1970 as a regional site for the University of Illinois College of Medicine and now houses regional campuses of the College of Nursing and the College of Pharmacy. A 58,000 square foot building addition dedicated in August 2010 allowed for the regionalization of the College of Pharmacy. The College of Pharmacy at Rockford has modern classrooms with state-of-the-art distance education equipment, new compounding and dispensing laboratories, standardized patient suites and a new library and computer labs. The Rockford campus also has research laboratories for faculty members conducting state-of-the art research contributing to the research mission of the college. The Rockford Program admitted its first class in the fall of 2010 and graduated its first class in the spring of 2014. The college provides all four years of pharmacy education at the Rockford campus. The first three years are didactic with early practice experiences, followed by a series of six, six-week advance rotations conducted at sites in the Rockford area as well as throughout Illinois.

The College of Pharmacy is viewed as a single institution with one accreditation but two campuses: Chicago and Rockford. Students on both campuses complete the identical curriculum.  The core classes are taught live via distance education using state-of-the-art technology. Laboratory and recitation sessions, as well as many electives, are taught locally by faculty at each campus. Select students are admitted to the Rural Pharmacy (RPHARM) program. This program takes the regular PharmD program and adds a rural emphasis to it. These students have rural backgrounds and receive training and mentorship focusing on the healthcare needs of rural communities in Illinois. Students in this program train collaboratively with medical students from the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford Rural Medicine (RMED) program to help prepare them to meet the health care needs of rural communities. The College of Pharmacy also offers an Urban Pharmacy (UPHARM) program, the regular PharmD program with an urban emphasis, to educate select students who are willing to serve urban residents in Illinois. The UPHARM fits into the urban mission of the University. The UPHARM curriculum is designed to represent an innovative approach that takes advantage of our location in Chicago to address the many challenges of healthcare disparities in underserved communities.

Doctor of Pharmacy Degree

To earn the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree at UIC, a prospective applicant will have to complete a minimum six years of study. The first two years of pre-pharmacy/prerequisite course work can be accomplished at any regionally accredited college or university. The final four years of professional education are to be completed at the UIC College of Pharmacy. The prospective applicant is advised to contact the Office of Student Affairs (OSA) at the College of Pharmacy for further information at (312) 996-7242 or to obtain information at the OSA website http://www.uic.edu/pharmacy/student_affairs.

Accreditation

The University of Illinois at Chicago Doctor of Pharmacy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education, 135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, Illinois 60603-4810, (312) 664-3575; fax: (312) 664-4652, http://www.acpe-accredit.org.

Admission

New students may begin only in August each year. Students are admitted to the college one of three ways:

  1. new student;
  2. Guaranteed Professional Program Admissions (GPPA) student; or
  3. transfer student.

High School Preparation

Biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics are the foundations for courses at the College of Pharmacy. Humanities, social studies, and communication skills are also important. Prospective students should take the highest level of a challenging college preparatory course of study that includes at least one year, preferably two years each, of precalculus mathematics that includes algebra, trigonometry, and geometry; calculus; biology; chemistry; and four years of English or speech. Physics is highly recommended. Computer literacy is a valuable asset to all college students.

Admission Policy

The College of Pharmacy Admissions Committee is responsible for admitting students to the program. Committee members are nominated by the faculty and, upon recommendation of the dean, are appointed by the chancellor. The committee is charged with the responsibility of formulating admission requirements, with the approval of the faculty, the University Senate, the University Admissions Committee, and the Board of Trustees. The goal of the committee is to identify candidates with the greatest potential for mastering both the knowledge and clinical competencies required for innovative clinical pharmacy practice and to admit students across all geographic, socioeconomic, and ethnic groups.

Admission to the college is selective and highly competitive. Admission criteria include demonstrated academic ability in pre-pharmacy programs, good moral character, proficiency and clarity in both written and spoken English, strong potential for professional outlook and behavior, evidence of leadership and maturity, and complete mental and physical competence to perform all tasks regularly expected of a registered pharmacist.

A conscious effort is made to select students to ensure a broad geographical distribution throughout the state of Illinois. The college seeks to admit applicants who can reasonably be expected to become educated graduates able to assume responsible positions in the healthcare profession and be leaders in civic and public affairs. Positive actions shall be taken to ensure, as far as possible, that applicants admitted to the college remain within the state and are willing, if necessary, to practice in areas with low pharmacist-to-patient ratios.

Students seeking a return to the college after an absence of one or more semesters are considered for readmission on the basis of the curriculum effective at the time of their return.

Applicants accepted for admission who fail to enroll and who wish to enter in a subsequent year must reapply for admission through Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS) and must meet all requirements in effect at the later time.

Matriculation and Continued Enrollment Policies

If selected for admission to the Doctor of Pharmacy program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, the student must be willing:

  1. To provide verification of immunity status as dictated by University immunization and clinical education requirements;
  2. To be in possession of a valid Illinois pharmacy technician license in good standing at all times or such licenses as required by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR);
  3. To provide one’s own transportation to off-campus pharmacy practice experience sites;
  4. To be in compliance with HIPAA requirements;
  5. To agree to and abide by the college's policy on audio/video recordings of curricular content for distance education; and
  6. To meet any other requirements, such as criminal background checks and drug screenings.

Failure to comply with the conditions above will result in refusal of further registration for course work.

Guaranteed Professional Program Admissions (GPPA)

The GPPA gives highly motivated and academically outstanding senior high school students an opportunity to be guaranteed admission into the College of Pharmacy. Students must demonstrate superior academic performance prior to their application and continued academic success prior to enrollment in the College of Pharmacy.

Students must meet the following minimum requirements to be considered for GPPA pharmacy admission (not all students meeting the minimum requirements for the GPPA program are admitted. Admission is competitive and space is limited each year):

  • have a minimum ACT composite score of 28 or SAT score of 1240;
  • rank in the top 15% of the high school class; and,
  • agree to meet College of Pharmacy Conditions of Acceptance.

College of Pharmacy GPPA Conditions of Acceptance

These conditions are subject to change. The most current list can be found online http://www.uic.edu/depts/oaa/spec_prog/gppa/conditions.html.

Students must:

  • earn a baccalaureate degree at UIC prior to entry into the College of Pharmacy [Students may choose to apply to the College of Pharmacy without completing a baccalaureate degree, but forfeit their GPPA status when doing so.];
  • not enroll in the College of Pharmacy for a period of three years from the time that they matriculate into their undergraduate college at the University of Illinois at Chicago; complete pre-pharmacy course work (including the baccalaureate degree) at the University of Illinois at Chicago within five years from the beginning of the freshman year;a
  • complete a minimum of 12 semester hours each term;
  • receive a grade of C or better in every prerequisite course [Courses in which a grade below C is obtained must be retaken. Both grades will be used in the GPA calculation.];
  • achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.50/4.00 to remain in the GPPA pharmacy program; [Students who achieve a first-semester GPA below 3.50 and at/above 3.25 are eligible for probation, in which case they will be given until the end of the second semester to raise their cumulative GPA to 3.50.]; and
  • complete all course work by the end of spring semester of the year of matriculation into the college.
a

The College of Pharmacy will accept AP credit and will allow prospective GPPA students to take college courses, taken through spring term/end of the academic year of high school graduation, that are accepted as transfer courses by UIC.

In addition, students must:

  • enroll in the Honors College, fulfill all requirements for continued membership, and graduate as a member of the Honors College;
  • take the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT). [These scores are used for evaluation and tracking purposes.]; and,
  • complete the entire application process for  the College of Pharmacy prior to the year of matriculation using the PharmCAS and supplemental applications, including the interview;
  • adhere to all of the College of Pharmacy’s “Matriculation and Continued Enrollment Policies” at the time of matriculation including obtaining a Pharmacy Technician License. 

Every semester, students must:

  • verify that a Degree Audit Report was sent to the Office of Student Affairs, College of Pharmacy, including for summer sessions [Degree Audit Reports should be directed to the attention of the GPPA Coordinator, College of Pharmacy (MC 874).]; and,
  • meet with a College of Pharmacy admissions counselor or the GPPA coordinator to discuss progress.

Upon satisfactory completion of all College of Pharmacy Conditions of Acceptance Requirements, a seat will be reserved at the UIC College of Pharmacy’s Chicago campus. Requests to attend the UIC College of Pharmacy’s Rockford campus will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis in the academic year prior to matriculation.

To obtain an application and more information, contact the University’s Office of Admission and Records, (312) 413-7628. For information, an application, or application status questions visit the website http://www.uic.edu/depts/oaa/spec_prog/gppa/contact.html.

Program contact is Office of Student Affairs at the College of Pharmacy (154 PHARM) at pharmosa@uic.edu.

New Students

Applicants to the College of Pharmacy must complete a minimum of 66 semester hours of pre-pharmacy course work. Pre-pharmacy courses may be taken at the UIC College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (see the Preprofessional Studies section of the catalog) or at any regionally accredited college or university (see the appropriate pre-pharmacy guides online http://www.uic.edu/pharmacy/prepharmacyguides) and must be completed by the end of the spring semester the year the applicant wishes to matriculate. The pre-pharmacy course work includes the following:

Pre-Pharmacy Requirements Minimum Semester Hours Minimum Quarter Hours
Communication, written and verbal 8 12
Life Sciences—Total 23 34.5
General biology with laboratory 8 12
Anatomy and physiology 8 12
Microbiology with laboratory 4 6
Genetics 3 4.5
Physical Sciences—Total 23 34.5
Inorganic chemistry with laboratory 8 12
Organic chemistry with laboratory 8 12
Physics 4 6
Biochemistry 3 4.5
Mathematics/Statistics—Total 6 9
Calculus (non-AP) 3 4.5
Statistics 3 4.5
Social or behavorial sciencesa 3 4.5
Humanitiesa 3 4.5
Total Pre-Pharmacy Course Work 66 99
a

Students completing an undergraduate degree at UIC must complete the General Education requirements. Students should consult the General Education section and their college/department sections of the catalog for more information no fulfilling these requirements.

General Education Core

Students completing an undergraduate degree at UIC must complete the General Education Core. Students should consult the Preprofessional Studies, General Education, and their college/department sections of the catalog as well as their advisor for more information on completing the General Education Core as part of their pre-pharmacy course work and chosen degree program.

General Education Proficiencies—University Writing Requirement

Students meet the requirement by achieving a passing grade in ENGL 160 and ENGL 161.

New Student Admission

To be considered for admission to the PharmD Program, candidates must:

  1. Complete all pre-pharmacy course work with a C grade or better by the end of the spring semester of the admission year. C- (C minus) grades must be repeated. All pre-pharmacy courses must be taken on a graded basis.
  2. Have cumulative, pre-pharmacy requirement/prerequisite, and science/math grade point averages of 2.75/4.00 or better at the time of application and thereafter. Repeated classes must be calculated into the cumulative and science/math grade point averages, but not the pre-pharmacy requirement/prerequisite grade point average.
  3. Complete a PharmCAS application and keep the PharmCAS record up to date at all times (http://www.PharmCAS.org).
  4. If invited, complete and submit supplemental materials directly to the UIC College of Pharmacy.
  5. Take the PCAT (Pharmacy College Admissions Test). All applicants must take the version of the PCAT offered June 2012 or after. Scores must be submitted directly to PharmCAS.
  6. If an International applicant, demonstrate English competency by obtaining a score 550 (paper-based)/213 (computer-based)/80 (IBT, minimum subscores are writing 21, speaking 20, listening 17, reading 19) or better on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) if most of the applicant’s college education was completed in a non-English speaking country OR by scoring a minimum of 6.5 on the IELTS (minimum subscores are listening 6, writing 6, reading 6, speaking 6). TOEFL and IELTS results must be submitted to PharmCAS. Scores over two years old are invalid.
  7. If selected, participate in an on-site admission interview and assessment of written and verbal communication skills.

Transfer Students

The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy will consider for transfer admission students who began their pharmacy education at other ACPE-accredited schools of pharmacy if they meet the criteria and if they are willing to accept curricular adjustments as a result of changing schools. Credit for, and waivers from enrolling in, certain courses may be awarded to transfer students who have already completed courses evaluated as equivalent to comparable courses in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy PharmD curriculum. Pharmacy school curricula vary considerably. As a result, transfer students are often required to repeat courses in order to fulfill graduation requirements. Students may only transfer into the didactic curriculum. No consideration will be given to students who wish to transfer solely to complete their clerkships at University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy sites. In addition, a minimum of three years in enrollment residence as a full-time student in the College of Pharmacy is required to receive the PharmD degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Transfer students will only be considered for fall semester admission. Application materials must be submitted to the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, Office of Student Affairs, 833 South Wood Street, Room 154 (MC 874), Chicago, IL 60612 by February 15. See the College of Pharmacy Office of Student Affairs website for full details: http://www.uic.edu/pharmacy/student_affairs.

Degree Requirements

See the Doctor of Pharmacy page for degree requirements.

Other Requirements

Elective Credit

Students are required to take a total of 13 semester hours of didactic electives during the P-1 to P-3 years.

Full-Time Enrollment

All students are expected to attend full-time. Only in extenuating circumstances may students attend part-time. Because of its prerequisite structure, the pharmacy curriculum cannot be completed in a reasonable amount of time on a part-time study basis. Classes are usually scheduled Monday to Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. However, a few campus-wide elective offerings are taught in the early evening. Pharmacy practice experience courses may require that student schedules coincide with patient care or other practice activities, thus, students must be available to participate on a flexible schedule.

Grade Point Average (GPA) Requirement

To qualify as a candidate for graduation, a student must earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.00/4.00.

Graduation Declaration/Filing to Graduate

Students declare their intent to graduate online using my.UIC. The deadline for submission to the Pending Degree List is the end of the third week (fall and spring) or second week (Summer Session 2) of the term in which graduation is sought. Failure to submit the request at this time may delay the awarding of the degree. A final review will be made following the close of the term. If a student has satisfactorily completed all the degree requirements, the student’s name will be placed on the official degree list.

To qualify as a candidate for graduation, a student must be of good moral character, pass all required courses in the curriculum, pay all indebtedness to the University, and be certified by the faculty of the College of Pharmacy.

Enrollment Residence Requirement

A minimum of three years in enrollment residence as a full-time student in the College of Pharmacy is required to receive the PharmD degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

College Policies

Academic policies related to the College of Pharmacy curriculum may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs or on the College of Pharmacy Office of Student Affairs website http://www.uic.edu/pharmacy/student_affairs.

Professional Honor Code

The students of the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy recognize that honesty, truth, and integrity are core values to the development of professionalism and underpin the college’s mission as an institution of higher education. They also recognize that professionalism is nurtured and developed as a student progresses through the Doctor of Pharmacy program and becomes socialized into the profession of pharmacy. This student growth is developed through reflective introspection and exposure/interaction with one’s fellow students, faculty, alumni, and the profession of pharmacy. To facilitate this professional growth, a subcommittee of the ad hoc Academic Integrity Committee of the College of Pharmacy composed of students, faculty, and administrators has created an Honor Code built upon current University policies and procedures as these relate to professionalism, inclusive of academic integrity. The Code describes the responsibilities of Doctor of Pharmacy students, graduate students, faculty, and the administration in upholding academic integrity while creating an environment that respects the rights of individuals to the due process offered by administrative hearings and appeals. It is expected that all individuals who are enrolled in courses and/or programs conducted by the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, and all individuals responsible for student learning act in accordance with the provisions of this policy.

Academic Probation, Dismissal and Continued Enrollment

Probation Rules

A student receiving a grade of "F" or "U" in any course (core or elective) will be placed on academic probation. A student failing to obtain a semester grade point average (SGPA), a cumulative grade point average (CGPA), or a core course GPA of at least 2.00/4.00 in courses completed at the University of Illinois at Chicago will be placed on probation or refused further registration as indicated below. 

Probation is removed at the end of any semester when the SGPA, CGPA, and core course GPA for courses completed at the University of Illinois at Chicago equal or exceed 2.00/4.00.

Refusal of Further Registration

A student will be denied further registration under any of the following conditions:

  1. A student is 10 or more grade points (hours down) below a 2.00/4.00 CGPA for courses completed at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
  2. A student remains on probation for two consecutive semesters (excluding summer semester) and fails to remove himself/herself from probation status after the second semester.
  3. If a student does not obtain a passing grade after taking core courses or required pharmacy practice experience courses twice.
  4. A student fails to meet conditions and terms of probation stipulated by the Academic Standing Committee.
  5. Any student who does not meet the conditions of the Matriculation and Continued Enrollment Policies.

Readmission by Petition

Students refused further registration for poor scholarship may petition the Academic Standing Committee of the college for readmission. Students must present clear evidence of improved scholarship potential before the Academic Standing Committee will consider the petition. The review and reconsideration of a student dismissed because of poor scholarship are no guarantee of admission. Except in unusual circumstances, students will be readmitted only once. If a student’s petition is denied, the student will be dismissed from the University.

Class Attendance

Student attendance is essential and expected in all courses offered by the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy. Regular and punctual attendance at all scheduled classes, laboratories, and recitations is expected of all College of Pharmacy students. In addition to prompt arrival to class, each student is expected to remain in class for the entire length of each session. At the discretion of the faculty member, student attendance may be incorporated into the course grade.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences Registration Requirements

All students are considered eligible to begin the advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE) when they satisfy requirements for 109 semester hours with a University of Illinois at Chicago cumulative grade point average of 2.00/4.00 or higher. In addition, all students are required to satisfactorily complete, with a grade point average of 2.00 or better, all core courses before entering APPE. If a student has a cumulative grade point average below 2.00, the student will be required to repeat selected core courses, as determined by the Academic Standing Committee, for which grades of D were received. In addition, the Academic Standing Committee also may require that the student repeat elective courses offered by the college for which grades of D were received. The student must receive sufficiently high grades in these courses to obtain a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or above. The student will be allowed one calendar year to complete these courses. In extreme cases, the Academic Standing Committee can extend this time period to two calendar years.

Grading Policy

An Incomplete (I) grade must be removed within 12 months of the end of the term in which the I was received or prior to the start of APPE, whichever comes sooner. Course instructors may require an earlier deadline. If the student fails to complete the course work within the aforementioned time frame, the instructor will assign an F for the final grade. The Office of Student Affairs will notify instructors when the 12-month time limit (or the start of APPE) will occur.

Class Standing

Class standing is defined as the successful completion of all core courses required for a particular class year. An example is as follows: in order to achieve P-2 class standing, all required core courses in the P-1 year must have been taken and the student must have received a passing grade in those courses. In order to achieve P-3 class standing, all required core courses in the P-2 year must have been taken and the student must have received a passing grade in those courses.

Repeating a Course

In the event that a required course is failed, it must be successfully completed in subsequent registration in the course. The original failing grade and the subsequent earned passing grade will be included in the cumulative grade point average. Core courses and required pharmacy practice experience courses may be taken a maximum of two times. If a student does not obtain a passing grade after taking the core course or required pharmacy practice experience twice, the Academic Standing Committee will be obliged to drop the student from the program. Only under extraordinary circumstances will the Academic Standing Committee make exceptions to this policy. A student may not repeat for credit a College of Pharmacy course in the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum for which a grade of C or better has been earned previously.

Transferring

Intercollege Transfer Students

See earlier section on Admission.

Transfer Students from Other Colleges and Universities

See earlier section on Admission.

Academic Advising

Advising Policy

All students are assigned academic advisors from the faculty and staff of the college upon matriculation. The Office of Student Affairs staff is available for referrals and assistance. Students or their advisors may request reassignment at any time.

Students with Disabilities

Any UIC College of Pharmacy student, who has a documented disability, as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, will be referred to the campus Disability Resource Center. The college will make accommodations on a case-by-case basis with advice from the Disability Resource Center. Students with disabilities who require accommodations for full access and participation must be registered with the Disability Resource Center.

Academic Honors

Latin Honors

Students who have a cumulative grade point average in the College of Pharmacy of 3.50/4.00 or higher upon completion of graduation requirements will earn Latin Honors. These honors will appear on their UIC transcripts and are listed below:

  • Summa cum laude: 3.90 and above (highest praise)
  • Magna cum laude: 3.75 to 3.89 (high praise)
  • Cum laude: 3.50 to 3.74 (praise)

Dean’s List

The Dean’s List honors students each semester who have completed a minimum of 12 hours of course work at the College of Pharmacy and have achieved a grade point average of at least 3.50/4.00.

State Registration of Pharmacists

The Illinois Pharmacy Practice Act provides that a candidate for licensure as a registered pharmacist must have attained the age of 21 years or over; must be of good moral character and temperate habits; must be a graduate from a department, school, or college of pharmacy recognized and approved by the Illinois Department of Professional Regulations; and must satisfactorily pass an examination prescribed by the State Board of Pharmacy. Questions relating to licensure and administration of the Illinois Pharmacy Practice Act should be directed to the

Illinois Department of Professional Regulations
320 West Washington
Springfield, Illinois 62786
(217) 785-0800

or the

Department of Professional Regulations
James R. Thompson Center
100 West Randolph, Suite 9-300
Chicago, Illinois 60601
(312) 814-4500

Student Organizations

Pharmacy students have a variety of student organizations available to them, ranging from professional and fraternal societies and professional organizations to student government. Involvement in student organizations can enhance the learning experience at the College of Pharmacy and aid in the development of valuable leadership skills. Several professional organizations are represented at the college: Academy of Students of Pharmacy, the student organization of the American Pharmaceutical Association; the Asian Pharmacy Association; the Association of Indian Pharmacists in America; the Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International; the Community Drug Education Committee (CDEC), the student outreach organization; the student chapter of the Illinois Council of Health-System Pharmacists (ICHP); and the Student National Pharmaceutical Association, an organization for minority students in pharmacy seeking to promote self-reliance, self-awareness, and excellence in pharmacy practice.

A number of honorary organizations are represented in the College of Pharmacy: Phi Lambda Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, and the Phi Chapter of Rho Chi.

The college’s four fraternal organizations are both professional and social; they promote the development of the health sciences and the profession of pharmacy, as well as sponsor various social events. They are as follows: Lambda Kappa Sigma, Kappa Psi, Phi Delta Chi, and Rho Pi Phi.

For those students interested in student government, each class in the college has four class officers and two representatives, who represent their class on the Student Council. Students also sit on various college committees.

Undergraduate Program

Courses

PHAR 321. Drug Delivery Systems I. 3 hours.

The roles of dosage forms and drug delivery systems in health care. Pharmaceutical calculations included. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Doctor of Pharmacy program. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

PHAR 322. Drug Delivery Systems II. 3 hours.

Continuation of PHAR 321. The roles of additional dosage forms and drug delivery systems in health care. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 321. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

PHAR 323. Drug Delivery Systems III. 3 hours.

The the role of non-sterile and sterile dosage forms and drug delivery systems in health care. Pharmaceutical calculations for parenteral dosage forms included. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 322. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

PHAR 324. Contemporary Pharmacy Practice. 3 hours.

Students obtain experience in compounding dosage forms, dispensing medications, counseling patients, problem solving and administration of various dosage forms. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 323 and credit or concurrent registration in PHAR 455. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

PHAR 331. Fundamentals of Drug Action I. 5 hours.

Introduction to basic concepts of drug chemistry and biological targets. Chemistry of simple bimolecules, redox chemistry, stereochemistry. Biology of nucleic acids, proteins, and membranes. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): One year of organic chemistry with laboratory and one year of general biology with laboratory. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

PHAR 332. Fundamentals of Drug Action II. 4 hours.

Continuation of PHAR 331. Includes drug-receptor interactions, drug design, mechanistic enzymology, and cellular chemistry and immunology. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 331.

PHAR 333. Fundamentals of Drug Action III. 4 hours.

Continuation of PHAR 332. Topics of microbiology and virology, drug metabolism and chemical toxicology, basic clinical chemistry with laboratories. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 332.

PHAR 342. Experiential I - IPPE. 2 hours.

Introduction to contemporary pharmacy practice including the Ashville Project, Cultural Competence, and controversial issues/topics in pharmacy practice. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 441 and a current pharmacy technician license in good standing. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.

PHAR 343. Pharmacy Systems Management. 2 hours.

Personnel management and human resources issues in professional pharmacy practice. Introduction to pharmacy operations management, the process of change management, and management of innovative changes in pharmacy practice. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Second year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program.

PHAR 344. Social and Behavioral Pharmacy. 2 hours.

Application of behavioral science principles and theories in understanding patient and health professional behavior, and application of social issues involved in pharmacy practice. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Doctor of Pharmacy program.

PHAR 346. Pharmacy Services and Reimbursement. 2 hours.

Techniques in marketing of pharmaceutical care services and developing compensating mechanisms for pharmacy services, discussion of managed care principles, and health care financing issues. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 441.

PHAR 352. Experiential II - IPPE. 2 hours.

Introduction to concepts and skills used by pharmacists to provide direct patient care. Development of skills required to gather information, conduct physical assessment and document information relevant to therapeutic interventions. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 342 and PHYB 301 and PHYB 302 and a current pharmacy technician license in good standing. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory, one Lecture-Discussion, and one practice.

PHAR 353. Experiential III - IPPE. 2 hours.

Students are given information and participate in exercises that will enable them to develop the skills pharmacists need to gather, evaluate, document and communicate information relevant to therapeutic interventions and overall patient care. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 352 and third year professional standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory, one Lecture-Discussion, and one practice.

PHAR 354. Experiential IV - IPPE. 2 hours.

Students will participate in exercises enabling them to develop the skills a pharmacist needs; to gather, evaluate, document and communicate information relevant to therapeutic interventions and overall patient care in special patient populations. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 353 and third year professional standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion,one Lecture-Discussion, and one Clinical-Practice.

PHAR 356. Principles of Pharmacoeconomics and Drug Treatment Outcomes. 2 hours.

Basic and applied concepts of economic efficiency, pharmacoeconomics, decision models and drug therapy outcome measures are presented with an emphasis on the practical application of such priniciples. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Doctor of Pharmacy program. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture.

PHAR 357. Experiential V - IPPE. 4 hours.

The primary setting for this course is a direct patient care setting where the students will apply their successfully completed didactic and previous early experiential coursework to the patient care setting. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 342 and PHAR 344 and PHAR 352 and PHAR 353 and PHAR 354 and PHAR 365 and PHAR 401 and PHAR 402 and PHAR 403 and PHAR 404 and PHAR 405 and PHAR 406 and PHAR 407 and PHAR 408 and PHAR 455; or consent of the instructor and Third year professional standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture/Discussion and one Clinical Practice.

PHAR 365. Non-Prescription Pharmaceuticals and Herbal Medicinals. 3 hours.

A pharmacotherapeutics course discussing the use of non-prescription drugs, supplies, and herbal medicinals with emphasis on the pharmacist's role as communicator, educator, and adviser to patients. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Third year professional standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of the instructor.

PHAR 371. Ambulatory Care - APPE. 4 hours.

Clinical pharmacy experience in patient interviewing, patient monitoring, and drug therapy. Emphasis placed on disease states and their treatment in ambulatory care patients. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Fourth year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program and a current pharmacy technician license in good standing.

PHAR 372. Community Practice - APPE. 4 hours.

Clinical pharmacy experience in patient interviewing, patient monitoring, and drug therapy. Emphasis will be placed on disease states and their treatment in community practice. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Fourth year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program and a current pharmacy technician license in good standing.

PHAR 373. Hospital Practice - APPE. 4 hours.

Clinical pharmacy experience in patient interviewing, patient monitoring, and drug therapy. Emphasis will be placed on disease states and their treatment in hospital practice. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Fourth year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program and a current pharmacy technician license in good standing.

PHAR 374. Medicine - APPE. 4 hours.

Clinical pharmacy experience in patient interviewing, patient monitoring, and drug therapy. Emphasis will be placed on disease states and their treatment in general medicine patients. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Fourth year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program and a current pharmacy technician license in good standing.

PHAR 385. Remediation. 2-5 hours.

A remediation option for students who previously failed courses that are no longer taught in the PharmD curriculum. Course content will mirror content from the core course that the student failed. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 15 hours.

PHAR 400. Pharmacokinetics. 3 hours.

Concepts and principles in pharmacokinetics including theories and basis for drug receptor actions, drug absorption, distribution, excretion and biotransformation. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in PHAR 322 and credit or concurrent registration in PHAR 332 and credit or concurrent registration in PHYB 302. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 401. Principles of Drug Action and Therapeutics I. 3 hours.

Integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics and toxicology in the drug actions related to the disease states associated with the endocrine, renal, optical and auditory systems. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHYB 302 and PHAR 342 and PHAR 400 and second year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 402. Principles of Drug Action and Therapeutics II. 4 hours.

Integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics and toxicology in the areas of the autonomic nervous system, cardiology, lipid disorders and hypertension. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHYB 302 and PHAR 342 and PHAR 400 and second year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 403. Principles of Drug Action and Therapeutics III. 3 hours.

Integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology in the area of infectious disease. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 352 and PHAR 401 and PHAR 402 and second year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 404. Principles of Drug Action and Therapeutics IV. 3 hours.

Integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, and toxiocology in the areas of women's and men's health, respiratory disorders, diabetes and pediatrics. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 352 and PHAR 401 and PHAR 402 and second year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 405. Principles of Drug Action and Therapeutics V. 3 hours.

Integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics and toxicology in the areas of drug abuse, cerebrovascular diseases, parkinson's and epilepsy. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 353 and PHAR 401 and PHAR 402 and third year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 406. Principles of Drug Action and Therapeutics VI. 3 hours.

Integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology in the areas of pain management and psychiatric disorders. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 403 and PHAR 404 and third year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 407. Principles of Drug Action and Therapeutics VII. 4 hours.

Integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology in the areas of transplants, gastrointestinal disorders, body fluids, nutrition, and the impact of drug therapies on a geriatric person. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 353 and PHAR 401 and PHAR 402 and third year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 408. Principles of Drug Action and Therapeutics VIII. 3 hours.

Integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology in the areas of bones and joints, hematological disorders, oncology. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 353 and PHAR 401 and PHAR 402 and third year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 410. Integrated Physiology. 3 hours.

Reviews and integrates principles introduced in pre-requisite physiology, anatomy and biochemistry courses to human non-pathological and pathological situations. Active learning will promote problem-solving skills. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory-Discussion.

PHAR 411. Introduction Pharmacy Practice. 4 hours.

Students will be introduced to the practice of pharmacy through a combination of lectures, on-campus introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) simulations, and a week-long shadow experience (off-site) in a pharmacy practice setting. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Current Illinois Pharmacy Technician License and completed college background check and drug screen and immunization records on file with the college. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory-Discussion and one Clinical Practice.

PHAR 412. Introductory Pharmacy Practice (IPPE): Community. 2 hours.

Overview of contemporary pharmacy practice in a community setting. Students will spend the majority of their time off-site at a community pharmacy enabling them to observe and develop the skills necessary in this setting.

PHAR 413. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE): Hospital. 2 hours.

Overview of contemporary pharmacy practice in a hospital setting. Students will spend most of their time engaged in actual (off-site at a hospital pharmacy) or simulated (on-site) hospital pharmacy practice activities.

PHAR 414. Introductory Pharmacy Practice (IPPE): Introduction to Patient Care. 2 hours.

Introduction to the skills necessary to provide direct patient care. The goal of this course is to develop the skills necessary for communication of a pharmacotherapeutic recommendation both verbally and in writing.

PHAR 422. Fundamentals of Drug Action. 4 hours.

Comprehensive course in chemical mechanisms of drug action. The major objective is for students to develop an understanding of the connection between the properties of chemical compounds and therapeutic action of drugs. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion.

PHAR 423. Biomedicinal Chemistry. 4 hours.

Provides a strong foundation in clinical and medical biochemistry. Medicinal chemistry applications in clinical enzymology and medical biochemistry, biochemical signal transduction, and selected special topics will be covered.

PHAR 431. Pharmaceutics I - Pharmaceutics Principles, Drug Delivery Systems, and Calculations. 3 hours.

Content will initially focus on basic pharmaceutics principles applicable to all drug delivery systems. Solution products including sterile product solutions will also be addressed. Students will also learn and practice basic pharmacy calculations. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory-Discussion.

PHAR 432. Pharmaceutics II ? Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Calculations. 2 hours.

Content will focus on basic pharmaceutics principles applicable to suspensions, emulsions, topicals, solids, and other dosage forms will be addressed. Pharmacy calculations relevant to dosage form preparation will also be taught.

PHAR 433. Pharmaceutics III ? Complex Dosage Forms and Calculations. 2 hours.

Content will focus on basic pharmaceutics principles applicable to complex dosage forms (e.g., sterile products, extended release products, vaccines, etc.). Pharmacy calculations relevant to dosage form preparation will also be taught.

PHAR 434. Pharmaceutics IV ? Drug Delivery Systems Design and Calculations Competency. 2 hours.

Content will focus on dosage form design of sterile and non-sterile dosage forms; compounding; quality control; pharmacist?s role in preparation, compounding, and dispensing of dosage forms; and pharmacy calculations, including a competency exam.

PHAR 435. Pharmacokinetics. 3 hours.

Students will be introduced to basic principles of pharmacokinetics (e.g., absorption, distribution, biotransformation, excretion), factors influencing these parameters, and the use of common mathematical equations to calculate these parameters. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Laboratory-Discussion.

PHAR 438. Introduction to Drug Information. 1 hour.

Content will focus on omparing and contrasting primary, secondary, and tertiary resources, including their relative value and trustworthiness. Students will gain skills necessary to conduct systematic searches and extract information from appropriate sources.

PHAR 439. Pharmacoepidemiology and Biostatistical Reasoning. 1 hour.

The principles of biostatistics and epidemiology relevant to pharmacy practice and pharmacoepidemiology (e.g., probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, measures of association and causality, and measures of excess risk) will be reviewed.

PHAR 440. Evidence-Based Medicine. 2 hours.

Focuses on the evaluation of clinical research in the literature and its application to patient care decisions. Application and interpretation of statistical methods will be reviewed in the context of study designs.

PHAR 441. Roles, Environments, and Communications. 3 hours.

Selected factors that influence pharmacist's practice, societal, and professional expectations, and the importance of effective communications with a variety of patients and professional audiences. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Doctor of Pharmacy program.

PHAR 445. Pharmacy Law. 3 hours.

Federal and state statutes and regulations pertaining to the licensing of pharmacists, the practice of pharmacy, and distribution of drugs. Case law and the ethical dilemmas relating to the pharmacists' standard of care are included. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 342.

PHAR 455. Drug Information and Statistics. 4 hours.

Overview of drug information resources and statistics used in healthcare research, including systematic approaches for critical evaluation of the literature and effective communication of information. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): PHAR 441. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

PHAR 461. Pharmacy and the U.S. Healthcare System. 2 hours.

Introduction to the philosophy and mission of the pharmacy profession, the evolution of practice, and elements of the U.S. Healthcare System.

PHAR 462. Social and Behavioral Pharmacy. 2 hours.

Emphasizes the broader social and health systems-related issues that surround and affect patient care provided by pharmacists, nature of disease, illness and self-identity, patient, behavior change, physician prescribing.

PHAR 463. Personal and Professional Development. 2 hours.

Imparts knowledge, skills, abilities, behaviors and attitudes necessary for personal and professional competence and development, reinforcing the concepts of self-awareness, leadership, innovation, entrepreneurship, and professionalism.

PHAR 464. Patient Safety. 1 hour.

Reviews topics related to patient safety. Prevalence and risk factors for error in healthcare settings, systematic approaches to risk assessment and error investigation, and methods to improve health system safety will be covered.